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My Weekly Learnings #32 (31.10 – 06.11)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. In my experience, not body weight but these are the factors that improve health — healthy mother
– good education
– strong family bonds
– access to doctors
– well-paying jobs
– athletic childhood
– living in green walkable cities

Health is multidisciplinary, not a number. [Rujuta Diwekar]

2. Charcoal & Diamonds are both carbons. The difference lies in the configuration of the carbon atoms in them.

There’s a big lesson in here.

You can increase the value of something by changing its very nature by re-organizing its building blocks.

Inputs <> Outputs [Kavin Bharti Mittal]

3. Tips To Building Your Emotional Intelligence:

– Accept that you can’t be happy all the time
– Start to identify emotions in other people and yourself
– Accept that not all emotions have to mean something
– Identify when zero response is the best response [Mark Manson]

4. “MOTIVATION” = EFFORT + (INTERMITTENT) REWARD

Dopamine is the common currency of motivation, pleasure, and pursuit of pleasures. Everybody enjoys pleasure. That said if you achieve pleasure from food or experiences without having to put in any effort pretty soon those pleasures lose their potency. That doesn’t mean we stop pursuing pleasures but it lowers our baseline level of dopamine and causes us to pursue progressively smaller goals. That is not good.

These days pleasure is available to us without any work: High potency food, experiences, etc. that don’t require any strain or effort to achieve.

Some small amount of that is fine of course but the best way to keep your dopamine system tuned up for ongoing motivation and pursuit is to periodically avoid pleasures that are easy to access, focusing instead on pleasures that take effort to achieve. And sometimes it can even be useful to not reward yourself at all for hard work and instead just cycle right back into another round of effort. Of course, get your rest and your sleep too so you can continue to be motivated and in pursuit (and pleasure) for all your days and years. [Andrew Huberman]

5. “There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. That will be the beginning.”

‘Up to a point a person’s life is shaped by environment, heredity, and changes in the world about them. Then there comes a time when it lies within their grasp to shape the clay of their life into the sort of thing they wish it to be. Only the weak blame parents, their race, their times, lack of good fortune, or the quirks of fate. Everyone has the power to say, “This I am today. That I shall be tomorrow.” [Louis L’Amour – The Walking Drum]

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My Weekly Learnings #29 (10.10 – 16.10)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. Among painters, poets, writers, actors, bloggers, directors, influencers, capitalists, fundraisers, politicians and singers, you’ll find a few who want to go all the way to superfamous.
They understand that their work won’t reach every single human, it can’t. They’re okay with that. But they’d like to reach just a few more people than anyone else.

Back when the New York Times bestseller list mattered, they worked to be on it. Not just on it, but on top of it.

Back when 100,000 followers were seen as a lot on Twitter, they hustled to be in the top spot. And when it got to a million, then that was the new goal.

Pop albums used to sell millions of copies. Now they sell in the tens of thousands. But one more than just about anyone else is enough (for now).

The desire to be superfamous might come from a good place. The work is important, it deserves to be seen by more people. The work is arduous, and reaching more people with it feels appropriate. The work is measurable, and measuring better is a symptom of good work.

Or the desire might come from the same drive that pushes people to do the work in the first place. Bigger is better, after all.

The problems with superfamous are varied and persistent.

First, it corrupts the work. By ignoring the smallest viable audience and focusing on mass, the creator gives up the focus that can create important work.

Second, the infinity of more can become a gaping hole. Instead of finding solace and a foundation for better work, the bottomless pit of just a little more quickly ceases to be fuel and becomes a burden instead.

Trust is worth more than attention, and the purpose of the work is to create meaningful change, not to be on a list. [Seth Godin]

2. The 10 goods of rice, by Rujuta Divekar

A. Rice is a pre-biotic, it feeds not just you but the diverse ecosystem of microbes within you.
B. Hand milled, single polished rice can be cooked in versatile ways from kanji to kheer and everything in between
C. Leads to steady blood sugar response when you eat like the way Indians eat it – with pulses, dahi, kadhi, legumes, ghee even meat.
D. Easy to digest and light on the stomach. Leads to restorative sleep which further leads to better hormonal balance. Especially required in the ageing and the very young.
E. Great for skin, gets rid of enlarged pores that come with high prolactin levels.
F. Sustains and improves hair growth that an impaired thyroid may have damaged.
G. Rice growing communities tend to be more co-operative and gender equal.
H. Every part of rice is usable, bran fed to cattle.
I. Leaves behind adequate moisture in soil to grow pulses which then enrich the soil
further by working as natural nitrogen fixtures.
J. Grandmom approved – local, seasonal, belongs to your food heritage. Sustains
health, economy, ecology, PURE GOLD. [Rujuta Diwekar]

3. The secret to being productive is to work on the right thing—even if it’s at a slow pace. [James Clear]

4. Politician and Noble Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi on corruption:
“It is not power that corrupts but fear. Fear of losing power corrupts those who wield it and fear of the scourge of power corrupts those who are subject to it.”

Source: From her speech, “Freedom from Fear” [via James Clear’s newsletter]

5. Children’s dislike of cauliflower and broccoli is connected to the concentration of enzymes produced by bacteria in their saliva. The more of an enzyme called cysteine lyases their mouths produce, the more sulphurous brassicas will taste, according to research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. [8fact]

My Weekly Learnings #3 (11.04 – 17.04)

My Weekly Learnings #3 (11.04 – 17.04)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. • There are no full stops in success. There are just commas. Success is not a destination. Success is a journey.

• One who seeks victory is a Man. One who spreads Victory is a ‘Maharshi’.
(Maharshi, a Telugu film)

2. More isn’t better.
    Faster isn’t further.
    Money isn’t wealth.
    Habits aren’t destiny.
    Solitude isn’t loneliness.
(Shane Parish)

3. ‘Everyone is rational’
But if that’s true, then why don’t we all agree on the right next step?
It could be because everyone has a different experience, different data and different goals.

Or, it could be that you are the only one who’s rational.

And it could be that we all like to tell ourselves we’re doing the right thing, but ultimately, all we can do is make choices based on how we see the world.

The way we see things drives our choices, and, of course, our choices change the way we see things.
(Seth Godin)

4. ⁃ Early to bed, early to rise
    ⁃ Not skipping meals and eating on time
    ⁃ Being regular with exercise

Remain the most underrated and undervalued means to boost immunity,  simply because they cannot be packed into a bottle and sold as a pill.
(Rujuta Diwekar)