“In terms of their awareness and their understanding of life”

“In terms of their awareness and their understanding of life”

As Robin Sharma wrote about in The 5 AM Club, “everyone alive does the best that they can based on where they’re at in terms of their awareness and their understanding of life.”

Even though I haven’t gotten around to reading The 5 AM Club, I’m aware of Robin Sharma’s previous works, which have had a great impact on my life. So when I was listening to one of his podcast episodes, this particular line from his book came up and immediately struck a chord within me.

All of us are on different paths of life, we have different goals, different processes, different types of thoughts, and different styles of execution. Moreover, our understanding of how people around us operate, including our close ones, is always one of mystery. There are moments when you feel why is that person acting in such a way, or why did that individual not think about this (when it was right in front to notice), or why are we not operating the same way.

Questions of these sorts hit me every now and then, with respect to different moments and different people. Being on a path of figuring out more and more about life, about how our body and mind function, and being curious about the tiniest of things, all those things at an intersection make me constantly question the old methods, make me compare the traditional vs modern methods of doing things, make me understand more and more of human behavior and humanity (in general), those types of questions do come up every now and then, wondering why do people do certain things that aren’t helpful to them, why do they make those decisions that don’t help them grow, why to be on a path because someone else did it too.

But, with respect to each and everything, this simple line that everyone is doing their best of where they’re at “in terms of their awareness and their understanding of life” just hits gold.

They might necessarily not be doing the right thing, but based on this line, in their heads (with the current level of awareness they’ve and their understanding of life), they’re doing the right thing, they’re thinking the right thing, and they’re making their decisions based on that very thing too.

Now, with choice or if they stumble upon it, if they’re able to upgrade their level of awareness, or if they are able to elevate their understanding of life (and are able to see the broader, or rather the truer picture, than what is fed to them), then that changes things.

But, until something of that sort is happening, then well, every individual is going to continue to operate “in terms of their awareness and their understanding of life.”

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My Weekly Learnings #30 (17.10 – 23.10)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. How to have a disagreement that opens minds instead of closing them:
How can you possibly believe that?
→ How did you arrive at that view?

That’s ridiculous!
→ I’m surprised to hear you say that. Tell me more

You’re wrong!
→ What would lead you to rethink that? [Adam Grant]

2. Forgiveness is a productivity accelerator. The great saints, sages, and spiritual geniuses all understood that the main aim on the path to awakening was to stand in any mess that life sends and remain centered, courageous, serene, and free.

As Robin Sharma wrote about in The 5 AM Club, everyone alive does the best that they can based on where they’re at in terms of their awareness and their understanding of life. And once you realize that, you won’t be upset with them – you can begin to forgive them.

So resolve to forgive those who have hurt you [they made you stronger and nobler]. And commit to letting go of what no longer serves you [it got you to here]. Remember that the past was perfect preparation for you to become who you now are and to grow the extraordinary life that you now face the opportunity to create. [Robin Sharma]

3. Colin Powell’s 13 rules of life
Rule #1: It ain’t bad as you think. It will look better in the morning.
Rule #2: Get mad, then get over it.
Rule #3: Avoid your ego so close to your position that when your position
falls, your ego goes with it.
Rule #4: It can be done.
Rule #5: Be careful whom you choose.
Rule #6: Don’t let adverse facts stand in the way of a good decision.
Rule #7: You can’t make someone else’s decisions. You shouldn’t let
someone else make yours.
Rule #8: Check small things.
Rule #9: Share credit.
Rule #10: Remain calm. Be Kind.
Rule #11: Have a vision. Be demanding.
Rule #12: Don’t take counsel of your fears or naysayers.
Rule #13: Perpetual optimism is a force multiplier.

4. Art (movies, plays, fiction, paintings, poetry…) exists to create a change. Often, that’s a change in the viewer, and sometimes, powerful art changes the culture.

Art with no intent can entertain us, and it can also reinforce stereotypes and simply help what is in our world persist.

Art with selfish intent exists to manipulate the viewer to serve the needs of the artist. It doesn’t often spread, but when it does, it can have a corrosive effect on the world around us.

But art with generous intent is different. It might not address an issue the way you would (in fact, that’s precisely why we need it) and it creates tension as it helps us look at things in a new way.

The plays of Sarah Jones or a book by Sinclair Lewis or music by Charles Wilson or a movie by Amy Koppelman exist to make us think hard. To think about what we’ve taken for granted and to think about what might be different if we cared enough.

I’m not sure it even matters what the artist thought they wanted when they sat down to create the work. The art itself seems to want something, to make a change in the world. And the ability to create art like that belongs to each of us. [Seth Godin]

5. The only two ways to make money:
A. Add value
B. Subtract suffering [Sahil Lavingia]

My Weekly Learnings #17 (18.07 – 24.07)

My Weekly Learnings #17 (18.07 – 24.07)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. “It can be easy to think you’re going down the wrong path, that you’re making a huge mistake, that nobody gets it, that you’re the only one. The reason for this is simple: We hear a lot more from the people who disagree with us than the people who agree with us.” [Ryan Holiday]
(Listen to this in-depth here – https://open.spotify.com/episode/6FkCPauGZqUuimk11ipiPI)

2. The physiological sigh is a pattern of breathing that we all engage in in deep sleep. When levels of carbon dioxide in our bloodstream get too high, we, or our dogs, you can see your dog do this, will do a double-inhale, followed by an extended exhale. Children, or adults for that matter, that are sobbing and lose their breath, so to speak, will also do a double-inhale, exhale. That’s the spontaneous execution of what we call the physiological sigh. The reason it works so well to relax us is because it offloads a lot of carbon dioxide all at once, and the way it works is the following: Our lungs are not just two big bags of air. We have all these little millions of sacks of air, that if we were to lay them out flat, they would be as big as about a tennis court or so. The volume of air, therefore, and the volume of carbon dioxide that we can offload is tremendously high, except that we get stressed as carbon dioxide builds up in our bloodstream, and, it’s kind of a double whammy, these little sacks deflate.
Now, when we do a double-inhale, so I’ll do this now twice through my nose, or you could do this. You could do it through your mouth, but it works best through the nose. It’s inhale, and then you sneak a little bit more air in at the very end. When you do that, you reinflate those little sacks, and when you exhale, then you discard all the carbon oxide at once. So the simple way to describe this protocol is that, unless you are underwater, you do a double-inhale, followed by an extended exhale, and you offload the maximum amount of carbon dioxide. And we found in our laboratory, and other laboratories have found, that just one, two, or three of those physiological sighs brings your level of stress down very, very fast. And it’s a tool that you can use any time. [Andrew Hubberman, a Neurobiologist on Optimizing Sleep, Performance, and Testosterone on The Tim Ferriss Show] (Listen to the full episode here – https://open.spotify.com/episode/6Ac19ix9yioyJDXtTtNp2V)

3. Working on a better Mindset over 2021 while neglecting your Heartset sets up a situation of self-sabotage where your intellect knows what you should do yet your emotional world keeps you limited. [Robin Sharma] (Understand this in depth here – https://open.spotify.com/episode/5BwmXSljMOfuNwX0EhrKs2)

4. THE DREAM:
You want something. Month after month, year after year, you dream you are going to get it.

THE REALITY:
Nothing happens. You never come any closer to it…

THE TRUTH:
You didn’t actually want it. You wanted the idea of it. [Mark Manson]

5. When you only listen to the smartest person in the room, you miss out on discovering what the rest of the room is smart about.
Everyone you meet knows something you don’t—and has wisdom from experiences you haven’t lived.

Every conversation is a chance to learn something new. [Adam Grant]

My Weekly Learnings #11 (06.06 – 12.06)

My Weekly Learnings #11 (06.06 – 12.06)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. There is no life of only pleasure and no pain, of only success and no failure, of only acceptance and no rejection. To have one, you must have the other. [Mark Manson]

2. The moral panic over social media will continue to distract us from more important, less sensational problems like sleep and family closeness. Is this moral panic justified? [Nir Eyal] (Read more here – https://www.nirandfar.com/social-media-and-teens)

3. The purpose of life is the life of purpose [Robin Sharma] (Learn more here – https://open.spotify.com/episode/7jKed5UOAgPUBHCwmvP0ax)

4. The faster you jump to conclusions, the more likely you are to default to fashionable thinking. [David Perell] (Read more here – https://perell.com/essay/how-philosophers-think/)

5. Most people don’t want accurate information, they want validating information. Growth requires you to be open to unlearning ideas that previously served you. [James Clear]

‘Who will cry when you die?’ by Robin Sharma (Review)

‘Who will cry when you die?’ by Robin Sharma (Review)

Having read ‘The Monk who sold his Ferrari’ (the review of which can be read here) and ‘Daily Inspiration from the Monk who sold his Ferrari’ (the review of which can be read here), this book is in a similar yet a different ballgame altogether.

‘Who will cry when you die?’ is in a similar genre as the other ones mentioned above, what makes it different is the 101 Lessons that are broken down from the previous books – which are straightforward and to the point.

These 101 Lessons also act as daily reminders to living a better life each day – every lesson needs to be understood, to be implied and to be executed in our day-to-day lives.

In my opinion, this book shouldn’t be read in one go, but rather as lesson to lesson, as and when you apply it to your lives. One thing’s for sure, you’ll be a different person, an upgraded version of your previous self, once you imply these lessons to your life.

Looking for straightforward changes to your life – pick up this one and enjoy the process.

#RTHReviews

Daily Inspiration from the Monk who sold his Ferrari by Robin Sharma (Review)

Daily Inspiration from the Monk who sold his Ferrari by Robin Sharma (Review)

Book In Focus : Daily Inspiration from the Monk who sold his Ferrari

Author : Robin Sharma

Irrespective of having read ‘The Monk who sold his Ferrari’ or not, this book is a deep dive into the important lessons shared in that one – divided into tiny bits of inspirational material, one per day, in its entirety covering 365 days of the year.

This is one of those picks which aren’t supposed to be read altogether, but, one per day, depending on what date it is.

Why should you read the current day’s bit and not the ones before or after? Well, you should focus on the day you’re living, be in the present and not focus on the past or the future.

Coming back to the book, reading it everyday and also, at the same time, sharing it with others was a blessing in disguise, because the daily bits focused on such important elements of life – that it made it that much more valuable having focused on one bit – learning it, understanding it, implementing it – and then, focusing on the next bit on the next day.

That is how I’d summarize this book, it’s a good read, one that goes on for an entire year, and can also be repeated every other year too – because why not, those lessons have importance in our lives on a day-to-day.

This is also a perfect time to pick up this book, with 1st Jan coming along and you could then read it exactly for a year, start to end.

#RTHRecommends

The Monk who sold his Ferrari by Robin Sharma (Review)

The Monk who sold his Ferrari by Robin Sharma (Review)

• What Books Taught Us #4 – The Monk who sold his Ferrari •

Book In Focus : The Monk who sold his Ferrari
Author : Robin Sharma

Are you looking for change in your life?
Are you looking for Inspiration?
Are you looking forward to developing a different perspective to life?
Are you wanting to turn things around?

The Monk who sold his Ferrari – that’s the answer.

The book, as the title, suggests is a fable, that is surely going to change your life, once you read it.

Robin Sharma takes you on a journey, with every page you read and turn, there’s something new to learn, there’s something new to understand – a new perspective to life.

You might question yourself and your past; you might question the path you’re on; your mind will open to topics you’ve never thought of before. And, that’s the beauty of this book.

It’s a game-changer, literally! A new mindset, with a new perspective to life, a new beginning, a greater understanding of things within you and around you, this is what the book guarantees.

This sure can be the first book you pick up, in hopes of the change that you were looking forward to.

#TheMonkWhoSoldHisFerrari

Giveaway #2

Giveaway #2

• GIVEAWAY #2 NOW LIVE •
//📚 5 Books – 5 Winners – One Book per winner – 5 Steps to Participate//

• 📙 Books up for grabs •
• 1. The Monk who sold his Ferrari – Robin Sharma (Mindset) [My favourite]
• 2. Rich Dad Poor Dad – Robert Kiyosaki (Money)
• 3. Crushing It – Gary Vaynerchuk (Marketing)
• 4. Start with Why – Simon Sinek (Entrepreneurship)
• 5. The 5 AM Club – Robin Sharma (Mindset)

• How to Participate •
• A. Follow @rth24
• B. Tag 3 friends and comment which book you’d like to have and why
• C. Follow any one of these accounts (as per your interests) – @livethezazzlife or @zazzmedia or @zazzpreneurs
• D. Subscribe to my mailing list – RTH24.COM Daily Blog Updates [Link in Bio]
• E. Join my Facebook group – The Zazz Tribe [Link in Bio]

*I’m super excited for this giveaway because every book has its own importance and I want to share these books with as many people as possible so they could get inspired too*
//Winners to be announced on the 30th of July’19//

//For people in India only//

GIVEAWAY Access Link – https://www.instagram.com/p/B0VrZQMp-HK/?igshid=isrbl3anlcnm