“We really did have everything, didn’t we?” #DontLookUp

“We really did have everything, didn’t we?” #DontLookUp

The thing about films is, there’s always something to learn, sometimes through the storyline, or sometimes through a particular character’s performance. Then that film is also serving a higher purpose than just entertaining you because eventually, you’re able to takeaway something from it.

Such an instance happened with the film, Don’t Look Up, a satirical film on Netflix, directed by Adam McKay, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Jennifer Lawrence, Meryl Streep, Jonah Hill. The official synopsis reads: Two low-level astronomers must go on a giant media tour to warn mankind of an approaching comet that will destroy planet Earth. (Check out my review of the film here: https://rth24blog.wordpress.com/2021/12/25/rthreviews-dont-look-up/)

There’s quite an important line in the film, as said by Leonardo DiCaprio’s character Randall Mindy, “We really did have everything, didn’t we? I mean, when you think about it.”

P. S. The quote is spoiler-free, there’s no way for it to spoil anything from the film.

But that one line speaks volumes. That dialogue comes at an important point in the film, but its takeaway is such that we can realize it in our own lives as well.

We are living our lives running around, chasing more wants day by day sometimes confusing them for our needs, putting in more time and more effort just to fulfill those wants and to then eventually “be happy”.

The world is evolving, and with it, so is capitalism and media manipulation. Now there’s so much advertising that’s thrown at you, with a base of relatability, concern, growth, etc. In all of that madness, comes along status. Because humans will achieve everything, and yet not be content if someone else has “more”.

So in this chaos of achieving status, mixed with advertising and capitalism, and media manipulation, the individual out there, thinking “I’m making all the decisions” is now wanting more than ever. That individual is putting it all, physically and mentally, to get more.

And in that race, they forget, or rather at some point in their own life, they’ll realize, “We really did have everything, didn’t we? I mean, when you think about it.”

But, would that realization then come too late?

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The Last 7 Days #97 (10.01.21 – 16.01.21)

With another Sunday, here’s the 97th edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.


What To Read:

  1. India Now Among The Most Unequal Countries: World Inequality Report. Read more here.
  2. NFT Predictions for 2022. Check it out here.
  3. There are 7 money personality types, says psychology expert—how to tell which one you are (and the pitfalls of each). Read here.
  4. What if your brand gets ‘canceled‘? Read more here.
  5. This is the ‘worst food ingredient for your immune system’—especially during Covid, says immunologist. Check it out here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. On Sway, Kara and Phil Spencer, head of Xbox and executive vice president of gaming at Microsoft, discuss the elements of the metaverse that are mirrored in gaming and whether Xbox aims to become the Netflix of gaming, and much more. Listen to it here.
  2. On this episode of the DNA series, Gary speaks with Jade aka mumbot about her early beginnings as an artist, where her inspiration for NFTs and art, in general, came from, her intro into the NFT space, and much more. Check it out here.
  3. President Barack Obama sits down with Reid Hoffman in Part 1 of the episode (on Masters of Scale) on finding the right moment to act, and when the moment chooses you. Obama talks about how being in the right place, at the right time, with the right mindset enabled his political ascension. Listen here.
  4. On Cyrus Says, Chef Vikas Khanna talks about his amazing journey and career. They talk about how Punjabi families feed everyone with love and affection, Vikas’ new book ‘Barkat’, what it’s about, and how he wrote it in the pandemic. They also talk about Cyrus and Vikas being born during the 1971 war, the stories of partition that Vikas would hear about when he was younger, and tons more. Check it out here.
  5. Nicolas Cage reveals it all on ‘In The Envelope: The Actor’s Podcast‘, from the ongoing mission to find “eclectic” roles, to the keys to great on-set collaboration and tricks of the trade stretching back over four decades. Listen to it here.

What To Watch:

  1. Tech company lies exist on a spectrum. How far is too far? Watch here.
  2. 30 Questions with Shark Tank’s Aman Gupta and Namita Thapar ft Rohan Joshi, Sahil Shah, Tanmay Bhat. Check it out here.
  3. YouTube Channel Recommendation of the Week – The School of Life (a collective of psychologists, philosophers, and writers devoted to helping people lead calmer and more resilient lives. We share ideas on how to understand ourselves better, improve our relationships, take stock of our careers and deepen our social connections as well as find serenity and grow more confident in facing challenges.) Check out the channel here.
  4. TV Show Recommendation of the Week – Cobra Kai (Thirty four years after events of the 1984 All Valley Karate Tournament, a down-and-out Johnny Lawrence seeks redemption by reopening the infamous Cobra Kai dojo, reigniting his rivalry with a now successful Daniel LaRusso.) Now streaming on Netflix here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Madhuram (Manikyam, a generous man and the owner of a factory, offers Dhana, a young unemployed boy, a job and shelter. However, Sunitha, Manikyam’s wife, develops feelings for Dhana.) Now streaming on SonyLIV here.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


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My Weekly Learnings #42 (09.01.22 – 15.01.22)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. Long hours spent staring at screens underworks panoramic vision, predisposing us towards flight-or-fight sympathetic nervous system activity.

This is another reason that prolonged screen time can leave us feeling fatigued; the nervous system has been using a lot of resources to keep us alert, which can leave us feeling wired and tired and the eyes feeling exhausted. ⠀

The eyes are doing a lot of work when we engage in prolonged screen time behaviors. We aren’t aware of this work, but it is still physically (and mentally) fatiguing. This work involves blink and near triad reflexes and everything needed for high visual acuity foveal vision. It also involves dealing with glare, making sense of confusing focus and depth cues, and greater visual workloads. But that’s not all; screens also place extra demands on eye defenses from blue light. [Neurohacker]

2. “The longer you’re a teacher, the less you remember what it is like to be a student.

The longer you’re a doctor, the less you remember what it is like to be a patient.

The longer you’re a coach, the less you remember what it is like to be a player.

Change positions. A new perspective can improve your old methods.” [James Clear]

3. Writer David Chapman on how to improve your thinking:

“Learn from fields very different from your own. They each have ways of thinking that can be useful at surprising times. Just learning to think like an anthropologist, a psychologist, and a philosopher will beneficially stretch your mind.”

Source: How to Think Real Good

4. A song becomes catchy if a few words are repeated enough.

A lie starts becoming truth if it’s repeated enough.

A faith becomes blind if rituals are repeated enough.

We accept everything as safe & normal if an experience is repeated enough.

Repetition is the human kryptonite. [Kunal Shah]

5. What you do on the bad days matters more than the good days.

What you do when you don’t feel like it — when you’re not motivated, when everything seems hard — matters more to the ultimate outcome than what you do when you’re motivated and it is easy.

Maintain the momentum. [Shane Parrish]

Major Life Lesson from your School Memories

Major Life Lesson from your School Memories

When you look back at your childhood, do you remember each and every day of your life?
When you look back at your school days, do you remember each and everything that you were taught?
When you look back at your college life, do you remember each and every lecture that you attended?

While the answer for all of those questions is going to be a big no, what’s the point of these questions then?

Whether you have introspected upon your life or not, the biggest takeaway from these questions is, there’s no way to remember it all. You have lived your life, that phase was a part of it, you learnt new things, you grew, you evolved, and however you are today is a result of that.

But that’s not it. When you look back, what can you remember?
Certainly not the chapters you had to learn verbatim before the exams, certainly not the diagrams and maps and what not you had to draw.

What you can remember, is also a big takeaway for your life, one that you can use now to live your life ahead.

You don’t remember the school days; you remember specific moments (specific experiences) from that phase of life.

You used to wake up daily, you used to get dressed and go to school, attend your lectures, get back home, do your homework, prepare for your examinations, and you did that for 10 years of school (and that followed somewhat during college too).

But what you remember at the end of it, are specific experiences that you had during that time. You remember those particular moments and you think that school life was enjoyable (forgetting that routine, that pressure).

And now that same cycle repeats when that generation grows up and has to work during their 20s and ahead, and focus all their time there, following that same checklist – wake up, go to work, sit for a period of time, and then come back to do the same all over the next day.

The point being, when you think about it, in about 15-20 years, you won’t be remembering any of these days, in particular, all you’ll remember is a few experiences during this time that will sum up those 15-20 years, or your professional and/or personal life.

When that realization hits you, then you’d want to do things differently… You might want to take a different approach, a different path, maybe balance your time or balance your life in a different manner and move your focus elsewhere.

A minor amount of time is spent reminiscing upon your school days, and you come out with a key takeaway that has the potential to majorly affect the rest of your life.

Our thoughts root from 5 categories

Our thoughts root from 5 categories

All our thoughts root from somewhere. There’s an origin to everything, and that applies to our thoughts as well.

Right from the moment we are born, we are collecting information (now we may not remember everything is not of concern). These origins break down into 5 categories:

– Through associations (acquiring information from the immediate and exterior environment),

– through the social constructs (how the society functions to fit in or the set of steps that have been embedded for generations),

– through the biases (the multiple types of lens that the society has continued for generations through which they perceive/ assign people to a certain trait/ characteristic through which they can be judged easily),

– through the traditions and rituals (whether the intent behind those is good or not, and whether they have a good outcome or not is again a different issue, but they’re blindly followed for the sake of “tradition” becomes the issue),

– through the rules and laws (created by a set of humans who came to a consensus regarding the act of another human/s. Again carried through for years, without asking questions, or without updating them with how the kind currently function),

Through all of these things and more, our thinking gets molded in a certain manner, so much so that the majority of people start thinking the same way or rather approach most things about life the same way.

Best, Optimum and Worst Scenarios

Best, Optimum and Worst Scenarios

Every scenario in life has three possible outcomes: the best scenario, the optimum scenario, and the worst scenario.

These scenarios range from the most macro things in life: work, relationships, health to the most micro things in life: waking up in the morning, eating food on time, having a discussion/ argument with someone, meeting a deadline, etc.

Before you take on anything, there’s always a visualized scenario that takes place in your head, those visuals show you the best possible outcome of that particular scenario (that’s about to take place).

Whether that best possible scenario takes place or not is a different issue altogether, but right at the start, that’s what pops up in your head.

Now, as the process begins, you never know what’s going to happen, how much is in your control, and how much you’d have to adapt. That means, in reality, the outcome could go from the best possible scenario to the worst possible scenario.

Usually, when something like that happens, most people go haywire; unable to understand how to proceed, they aren’t able to process their emotions, nor their next steps.

As much as, in most of those visualized scenarios, the best possible scenarios may look the best, and the worst possible scenarios are those you don’t want to think of, especially at the beginning of the process… That leaves you with the optimum scenario.

The best possible scenario leaves you pumped up, and simultaneously, you avoid the thought of the worst possible scenario. But, said that thinking of the optimum scenario could actually be the best option for you, and something that would keep you balanced, irrespective of what happens.

The optimum scenario is playing in the middle, balancing between both of the other scenarios opposite to each other. Planning for that scenario keeps you in control (somewhat), you’re able to plan for steps beforehand, perceive things you wouldn’t have otherwise, and ultimately, stay balanced.

Thinking of the optimum scenario (in advance) means, anything beyond (the optimum) is just icing on the cake for you (that leads to the best scenario). But, anything worse, means you’re not totally disappointed, you probably have a backup (system) in place, and moreover, you’re now in a position to try and salvage as much as you can from the situation.

You’re now standing in a place, which you hadn’t imagined before, but somewhere where you can see what’s happening, plus nothing really surprises you here.

Every outcome can have these three scenarios, then it’s up to you, how you’d like to rewire your thinking, and what kind of a scenario would you like to be thinking about. Every action is followed by a thought, and every thought takes place because of a system (that is designed based on how you think and how you approach things – which is something that can easily be changed or modified).

The Forgotten Thoughts

The Forgotten Thoughts

Okay, so let’s see. Sometimes you focus on a particular topic and start thinking about it. Sometimes your thoughts vary according to your environment or situation at hand. Sometimes random thoughts come to you. In all, we are ranging more than sixty thousand thoughts on a daily average.

At this pace, it’s next to impossible to remember what exactly were you thinking about, probably five minutes ago. There are times when a sudden disturbance disrupts your chain of thoughts and now you’re suddenly sitting clueless. Different scenarios, different situations, but the bottom line is there are so many forgotten thoughts we can’t even recollect.

Out of all these forgotten thoughts, there would be so many that would actually be worth remembering, some thoughts you actually wanted to pursue deeper, but now you’ve forgotten them. A bunch of times, you aren’t able to remember why you entered a room in the first place, you may have forgotten what you wanted to convey to someone. All of those come under the umbrella of forgotten thoughts.

Now there is no one formula to remember all your thoughts, neither is there any individual who can remember them all. But, said that there is a pattern emerging behind the increase in these forgotten thoughts, especially in this current, modern, digital era.

When you observe these patterns, you notice how an individual is constantly trying to run after the next task, one after the other, there’s no space to breathe in the middle. This isn’t just the physical effort, but from the mental effort point of view as well. We are so preoccupied to do the next thing, that we aren’t giving us any space to think or rather to remember what we were thinking about.

And even when we do find the time, those gaps are pre-filled with us on our smartphones, hooked on to the screens, scrolling through one of the social platforms… consuming content at a pace you can’t remember what you scrolled through.

We are creating a habit of running around, and a habit of constant data consumption and emotional manipulation, that is leading to many more thoughts than before, at a faster rate than before, and now you’re forgetting more thoughts than before or not knowing that you’ve forgotten them.

RTHReviews: Pushpa – The Rise (Part 1)

RTHReviews: Pushpa – The Rise (Part 1)

There are quite a few performances where you cannot identify the actor anymore, and all you can see is the character in the film… And Allu Arjun does just that in Pushpa: The Rise.

Right from the first moment he enters the frame, until the end of the film, you simply cannot take your eyes off him, what a gripping performance. Whether it’s his one-sided dripping shoulder look or his attitude or his style, Allu Arjun is all swag in the film.

Where the entire film’s casting and their performance was on point and pretty much adds to the intensity and the tension in the film, one of the important factors in the film remains the storyline, which may seem so basic from a macro lens, but there’s so much happening in the three-hour duration, you never know where did all that time go. The cinematography of the film also adds to that aspect, with some really good frames and the slow-motion shots that gave the scenes the gravitas they needed.

Each of the cast members had something to add to the storyline, but one of the individuals who stood out with his performance was Fahadh Faasil, for the little time he was on screen, he was just magnificent in that role and the duo (him along with Allu Arjun) was just fiery.

Where this was simply just the first part of the series, it didn’t feel incomplete nor did it leave the audience hanging at any point in time. Pushpa: The Rise (Part 1) is brilliant, and I just cannot wait for that second part to be released soon.

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The Last 7 Days #96 (03.01.21 – 09.01.21)

With another Sunday, here’s the 96th edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.

Since the content I consume around the topics of mindset, marketing and movies brought me value, I decided to share that with you as well, through these weekly editions.

If any of the below-mentioned topics interest you, let’s chat – @rth24 on Instagram.


What To Read:

  1. Bill Gates has ‘never been a big New Year’s resolution’ person — why that’s smart, according to a clinical psychologist. Read it here.
  2. Nikhil Taneja writes this eye-opening and relatable thread on ‘performatives pressure’ in the creator economy of our world. Check it out on Instagram here.
  3. How Crypto Could Be Like the Music Industry? Read here.
  4. A neuroscientist shares the brain exercise she does for a stronger memory—and the mistake that can ‘harm’ it. Check it out here.
  5. Andrew Garfield Finally Spills About ‘Spider-Man’ Return and Future — and the ‘Gift’ of ‘Tick, Tick Boom!’. Read more here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. The Verge’s Nilay Patel, Dieter Bohn, and Alex Cranz run through the huge amount of products announced at the Consumer Electronics Show 2022 this week — from QD-OLED TVs, to EVs, to a hair-coloring gadget. Listen to it here.
  2. On the Mint podcast, Gary Vaynerchuk speaks on the 2022 Web3 trends: Music NFTs, Social Tokens and DAOs. Listen here.
  3. Dr. Andrew D Huberman breaks down the science of social bonding in family, friendship, and romantic love, on his podcast Huberman Lab. Check it out here.
  4. On Present Company, Andrew Garfield shares his intense preparation for the role, the urgency that lies at the heart of the story, and the importance of activist artists. He also reflects on the unique pressures faced by young actors today. Listen to it here.
  5. Director Kenneth Branagh discusses his new film, Belfast, with fellow director Christopher Nolan in a Q&A at the DGA Theater in Los Angeles. Listen here.

What To Watch:

  1. Is TikTok destroying sports? Watch here.
  2. Appearing on the Joe Rogan podcast, artist Beeple takes a deep dive into his art, the story behind ‘The Everydays’, and a bunch of random stuff. Watch it here.
  3. On The Maniesh Paul podcast, Prajakta Koli (aka MostlySane) talks about her journey as a creator, the opportunities in the field, touching upon friendship in this competitive space, and more. Check it out here.
  4. TV Show Recommendation of the Week – Shark Tank India (Aspiring entrepreneurs from India pitch their business models to a panel of investors and persuade them to invest money in their idea.) Now streaming on SonyLIV here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Pushpa: The Rise (Violence erupts between red sandalwood smugglers and the police charged with bringing down their organisation in the Seshachalam forests of South India.) Now streaming on Amazon Prime here.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


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My Weekly Learnings #41 (02.01.22 – 08.01.22)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. “I know that I know nothing” – Plato

The Dunning–Kruger effect is the cognitive bias whereby people with low ability at a task overestimate their ability. Some researchers also include in their definition the opposite effect for high performers: their tendency to underestimate their skills.

[Source: brainchat]

2. Why do you stick your tongue out while concentrating?
A 2019 study found that the area of the brain that is activated by complex hand movements sits right next to that engaged in the language.
Neuroimaging from that research indicated that something called “motor overflow” could explain why our tongues are trying to get involved when our hands start moving, as the overlapping networks spill onto one another.

3. When we admit what we don’t know, it increases the chance that someone, who does know, will offer to help. [Simon Sinek]

4. “A few major opportunities, clearly recognizable as such, will usually come to one who continuously searches and waits, with a curious mind, loving diagnosis and involving multiple variables. And then all that is required is a willingness to bet heavily when the odds are extremely favorable, using resources available as a result of prudence and patience in the past.” – Charlie Munger

5. Many people hesitate to share their work because they’re uncomfortable promoting themselves.

Sharing your art, writing, or invention isn’t an act of self-promotion. It’s an act of self-expression.

If you don’t put your ideas out in the world, no one else can benefit from them. [Adam Grant]

rth24.eth

rth24.eth

Web1 was about the aggregation and consumption of information. Web2 was about the creation of it, where everyone got the chance to connect with one another, got the chance to create memories, connections, and a platform to channel their thoughts, their creativity, into a digital output, but always under the umbrella of someone else.

Web3 gives users the chance to have ownership of what we do on the internet. It’s an extremely summarized statement of everything that Web3 is capable of, but then again, there’s so much to explain of it too.

There are the earliest adopters who are part of building it, since years, because everything new takes years of time and efforts to develop, it takes time to get into the mainstream, and then it picks up speed.

Then there are those at the second and third stages, who start understanding it at a little later point in time and join the path. Finally, it hits the mainstream when everyone knows they are in it or have to be in it, to proceed further.

There’s so much in Web3, and so much elsewhere that connect somewhere or the other, and amount to one big picture. Whether it’s cryptocurrencies, or NFTs, or the Metaverse, Tokens, DAOs, VR, AR, so much is being developed and so much is either happening now or will happen at a much larger scale in the future.

While today’s post is not one to get into the depth of those things, it’s about an entry point, an early recognition of someone being a part of Web3, someone who believes in it, and that’s having a .eth domain.

Where you don’t have to keep creating accounts everywhere, where you don’t have to fill in your account details everywhere, where you don’t have to send email addresses and what not to people to send you something, there’s going to be a .eth domain for everyone.

Users, brands, organizations have one now or will have it sooner or later, and that applies to everyone. The technological aspect of it is such that it’s a no-brainer to not have one and going to be used by the majority of us in a few years, probably.

And as much use case as it has, right now, in the current time, it also is an icon of recognition of someone who is a part of/ a believer of Web3, and that says a lot when the community is still small, which ultimately makes it easier to connect.

I, personally, have been a spectator for a while, just trying to grasp what I’ve been seeing, and now trying to get in the space as well. There’s no better understanding of anything in this space than doing it practically… Thus, having a couple of NFTs myself, understanding the platform, the community approach, the usability, the impact of it.

Moreover, super glad to have a friend like Pratik Gandhi (let’s hope he wouldn’t mind me using his name here), who gave me this rather amazing surprise of gifting me this domain, in a way letting me have such a good headstart in the space. So if you’re reading this, thank you very much.

For everyone else, there’s never too early, never too late, there’s so much to learn, so much to understand in this space… It’s at such an early stage right now and has a great amount of bandwidth to grow and evolve. So instead of rushing into anything, start small, start learning, as I am.

Our perspective is not the same as two months ago

Our perspective is not the same as two months ago

Irrespective of whether we learn something consciously or not, we are constantly observing new information, we are constantly learning new things. Our eyes, when open, are always watching and consuming, and our brain is simultaneously processing all this information and storing it.

How will this information be used or whether it’d be used or not is another story altogether, but what we know for sure is this information, this consumption, these observations will have an impact on our behavior, on our mental health, on the voice in our head, and moreover, our perspective.

We have a certain perspective of looking at life, at ourselves, at others, at how the world functions, at our needs and wants, at trends.

This perspective is constantly changing based on the new information we receive. How we thought six months ago, may not be the same way we think today. How we perceived things two months ago is not how we perceive things today. That process is constantly changing, and we along with it.

One, we need to evaluate that change in perspective, and how healthy is it, and whether it’s one we align with or one we need to take steps towards to change.

Second, we need to understand how this perspective is affecting our life and our day-to-day of it, how it is affecting our relationship with others, and how we look at people, generally, in the world.

Our perspective is constantly going to change, our habits are going to change, our thought process is going to change, our life is going to change, but so much of it is linked to one other, and we control so much of it too… It’s having that kind of perspective that allows us to see that and then let us do something about it.

My two cents on Shark Tank India

My two cents on Shark Tank India

With an interest in entrepreneurship, and also trying to understand the breakdown of how companies work, in different sectors, their approach, etc., one of the things that I’ve been hooked onto, is Shark Tank US for a while now.

What are the new ideas that people are pitching, how unique are those ideas, what kind are the investable ones, what do the Sharks have to say about them? There’s a lot to learn and understand when you watch it.

So having watched that for a while now, there was always a thought buzzing in my head, time and again, how would such a show work in India? Clearly, there’s been an uprising wave of entrepreneurs in the last few years, people are now experimenting, getting into new sectors. Now that we are finally having a Shark Tank India, how well will it stand on its own vs when compared to the popular Shark Tank US?

To be frank, when the news first came out, I was a little hesitant as to how the creators would be approaching the show, and would a show of this stature be ‘Bollywoodized’ as well and be like another reality show amongst many others that air on television?
(Bollywoodized: adding an extra flair of entertainment to what’s already entertaining, taking it to a whole new level)

Having this preconceived thought process, I approached the first episode of Shark Tank India and got exactly that, or rather my eyes only saw what I wanted them to see. Watching that first episode, I wondered how different are the types of questions being asked by the Sharks, in comparison to Shark Tank US… How different are people’s presentations and is every minute of it looking like just another reality show?

And then I see on Twitter, people mocking the show and calling it ‘cringe’, saying why is this show even happening, and picking out flaws here and there. At first, I agreed and thought, well someone else agrees too. But, the exact second thought was… “I got to give it another try, check out another episode, remove those preconceived judgments and then notice what I think about it”.

Maybe that was exactly what was needed. As soon as I watched that second episode, multiple thoughts arose in my mind…
1. Well, of course, everything is going to be different from what we’ve been seeing on Shark Tank US because our mindsets are different, our approaches are different, our environment is different.
2. We are coming from a place where people are told what they have to do, there are societal notions against entrepreneurship, against people starting up on their own, worries about the risk that is involved, and moreover, the formula of doing a job and getting a promotion because that’s been going on for years (not that it’s wrong, but when it’s forced upon people or when they think that’s the only way forward)… And to break all of that, especially to the people who have these notions, this is exactly the simplistic, basic, to the face kind of approach that the show needed.
3. In Shark Tank India, entrepreneurs aren’t just pitching to the sharks, but are also pitching to the people watching it, opening them up to this rising wave of entrepreneurship in our country. For that to happen, it is difficult to explain, but there’s an Indian touch to all the pitches, which matches the tone that was needed for mass acceptance. Plus we also get to see what other Indians are thinking, how unique or not their ideas are, what’s working, and what’s not, so that’s another pro-point.
4. When it comes to the sharks, there’s some good chemistry and camaraderie that can be seen, sometimes adding that extra touch of spiciness that will get the viewers excited as well. My own take has shifted from an initial approach of skepticism to loving every shark and wanting to know what they have to say about each idea that gets pitched.
5. Finally, there are always going to be flaws here and there. There are always going to be lessons learnt and then applied to the future seasons. Even the other Shark Tanks have worked the same way, and there are improvements seen over time, and so will the case be with this one as well.

This is exactly the right time for Shark Tank India in our country, the right kind of entertainment mixed with some good ideas and investments, that’ll get the audience hooked to the show, opening up their mindsets towards this space. Not only that, but giving people, of all ages, from all locations, the confidence to begin (if they want to).

I’m hooked to the show and quite glad about how it’s turned out to be. Back to watching more episodes in my free time.

Everything I cooked in 2021

Everything I cooked in 2021

One of my to-do things for 2020 was to learn how to cook. It’s one of the best skills to have, you then have the freedom to eat whatever and whenever you want, you accumulate a true understanding of what goes in your body, and its benefits and what’s not good for you, plus not only are you then not dependent on anyone, but you also get to share the fruits of your efforts with everyone else.

Once you start enjoying the process, then there’s no going back. There’s this fire that ignites within, and now you’re curious to try out more dishes, experiment more, and also stretch your current skillset further ahead.

With the pandemic happening in 2020, a lot of things changed internally and externally, plus our relationship with time, our relationship with ourself and so much more, and amidst all that, so much got delayed and postponed, along with that wishlist of mine. But, sometimes, a minor blip in time doesn’t change what you have set your mind to… Cut to 2021, when I jump in the kitchen right from the first day itself.

With every dish, I cooked, and all the help I received, there was so much to learn, moreover, it wasn’t just the outcome that was turning out to be good, but the process of understanding and making these dishes too that was quite enjoyable.

In these 365 days, I’ve tried out my hand on various dishes, of different cuisines, and a bunch of desserts too, because sweet-tooth. Here’s a quick preview of everything that I cooked in 2021…

RTHReviews: Harry Potter 20th Anniversary – Return to Hogwarts

RTHReviews: Harry Potter 20th Anniversary – Return to Hogwarts

Having watched (+ read) Harry Potter, with the timeline of growing up into teenagers and adults and the release of these films quite matching up, I don’t think there’s going to be anything more relatable in my life, than the Harry Potter series.

All the emotions that have been experienced watching them, all the takeaways and character connections that have been felt, there’s always going to be a soft spot for this franchise and no amount of reruns are going to ever be enough.

So, when after all these years, the news came out, of a Harry Potter 20th Anniversary Reunion, which was less of a reunion and more of a look back at the series, it was quite exciting to see what’s in store.

Sure, it always feels like you just saw the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows yesterday itself, and the timing of this would’ve always felt sooner, but it was their 20th anniversary… “It feels like no time has passed and loads of time has passed,” as said by Emma Watson at the beginning of the special. And to be honest, I’m up for anything more that comes out of the world of Harry Potter.

Releasing on the 1st of January, the timing of it couldn’t have been better… Is there a better way to start the new year than your eyes gleaming with excitement at the start and then ending up emotional and teary-eyed towards the end of it, and that’s a very summarized version of the Harry Potter 20th Anniversary: Return to Hogwarts.

Most of the characters back together, especially the main trio, reminiscing the ones we lost, taking us on a journey right from the start to the end, including untold stories and action from behind-the-scenes, all-in-all, it was quite nostalgic to watch the reunion. Some stories leave you with a reaction of ‘Whaaaatttt’ and some leave with you a tear in the eye… And especially the bonding of the actors, over all these years, and the bond that you share over the screen with them, having watched them hundreds of times and feeling connected with a trait or two, this was indeed special.

Having watched the series, right from the time the first one was released, celebrating a 20th year anniversary does feel different and how the time has just flown by, it feels like we’ll blink our eyes, and there’ll be a golden jubilee special too.

Robbie Coltrane, who plays the character of Hagrid, says quite a special line in the documentary… “The legacy of the movies is that my children’s generation will show them to their children so you could be watching in 50 years time, easy… I’ll not be here sadly… But Hagrid will, yes!” and I felt that.

So on continues the magic of the Harry Potter World, now back to rewatching the series.

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The Last 7 Days #95 (27.12 – 02.01.21)

With another Sunday, here’s the 95th edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.

Since the content I consume around the topics of mindset, marketing and movies brought me value, I decided to share that with you as well, through these weekly editions.

If any of the below-mentioned topics interest you, let’s chat – @rth24 on Instagram.


What To Read:

  1. 22 Tiny Mental Health Habits That Can Improve Your Life In 2022. Check it out here.
  2. However you feel right now is totally OK. Read more here.
  3. How did food tech in India evolve beyond Swiggy and Zomato? Read here.
  4. How ‘Spider-Man: No Way Home’ Was “Shaped” by Its Secret Stars? Check it out here.
  5. The best time to go to sleep for a healthier heart. Read here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. On Pivot, Kara and Scott look back at the biggest news of 2021. From the Capitol insurrection to the Facebook Files, 2021 was chock full of wild events, big personalities, and strange happenings. Listen to it here.
  2. On Modern Finance, Kevin Rose is joined by Alexis Ohanian, founder of venture capital firm SevenSevenSix and co-founder of Reddit, discuss Web2 lessons for Web3 aspirants, the cultural and economic benefits of diversifying the crypto space, NFT collecting, the future of investment, Bored Apes vs. CryptoPunks, the power of community, and much more. Check it out here.
  3. On My First Million, Sam Parr and Shaan Puri share their favorite Twitter accounts to follow and what they have learned from them. Listen here.
  4. When Hans Zimmer first started working on the music of Dune, he made what he calls a “sketchbook” – creating motifs and themes that might occur in the film. And in this episode of Song Exploder, he takes us through the first sketch he did for Dune. Check it out here.
  5. On Cyrus Says, Sanjeev Kapoor talks all about how he started out, started out the trend of celebrity chefs in India, and lots more. Listen here.

What To Watch:

  1. 2021, in 6 minutes. Check it out here.
  2. Elon Musk sat down with Babylon Bee for an in-depth interview on wokeness, Elizabeth Warren, taxing the rich, the Metaverse, which superhero Elon would be, and how the left is killing comedy. Watch it here.
  3. Jonah Hill, Adam Mckay, Jennifer Lawrence, Leonardo DiCaprio, Meryl Streep, and Tyler Perry break down their new Netflix film ‘Don’t Look Up‘. Watch here.
  4. Documentary Recommendation of the Week – Harry Potter 20th Anniversary: Return to Hogwarts (The cast from the film series ‘Harry Potter’ reunite and embark on a journey down memory lane with nostalgic conversations while celebrating 20 years since the first film.) Now streaming on Amazon Prime here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Minnal Murali (A tailor gains special powers after being struck by lightning, but must take down an unexpected foe if he is to become the superhero his hometown needs.) Now streaming on Netflix here.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


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My Weekly Learnings #40 (26.12.21 – 01.01.22)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1.

Source: Liz Fosslien

2. You have a choice between what you want now and what you want most.

Don’t let feeling good today come at the expense of the decade.

Be patient. Keep the end in mind. [Shane Parish]

3. Every communication platform teaches a different lesson:

Twitter: Cut the fluff
YouTube: People love a good narrative
TikTok: Nail the hook
Instagram: Make it beautiful
Email: Whatever you’re saying, shorten it [David Perell]

4. People who spent money on experiences rather than on material goods were happier because the excitement we often get from purchasing things tends to diminish quickly as we get used to them and start taking them for granted.

The research also noted that the joy and memories experiences bring can give us stronger feelings of satisfaction, even if the experience doesn’t last nearly as long as the physical item that we purchased.

Source: The Journal of Positive Psychology

5. Tribalism and integrity battle in each of our heads.

When our tribe is behaving according to our principles, we’re in the yellow zone where life is easy. Our true colors reveal themselves only when our tribe is behaving badly and we’re forced to choose either orange or green.

[Tim Urban]

My Top Songs/ Movies/ Shows and more of 2021

My Top Songs/ Movies/ Shows and more of 2021

As 2021 comes to an end and having watched a ton of movies and shows, plus listening to music and podcasts, this is a list of, according to me, my top songs, movies, shows, podcasts of 2021.

Here we go…

Top 5 Malayalam Films of 2021 –

1. Drishyam 2
2. Joji
3. Nayattu
4. Kurup
5. Malik


Top 5 Tamil Films of 2021 –

1. Master
2. Maara
3. Jai Bhim
4. Karnan
5. Sarpatta Parambarai


Top 5 Hindi Films of 2021 –

1. Shershaah
2. Sardar Udham
3. Sherni
4. Sandeep aur Pinky Faraar
5. Sooryavanshi


Top 5 Telugu Films of 2021 –

1. Most Eligible Bachelor
2. Love Story
3. CinemaBandi
4. Thimmarusu
5. Ala Vaikunthapurramuloo (2020)


Top 10 English Films of 2021 –

1. Zack Snyder’s Justice League
2. The Mauritanian
3. Pig
4. The Harder they Fall
5. CODA
6. King Richard
7. Don’t Look Up
8. tick, tick… BOOM
9. Belfast
10. Spiderman: No Way Home


Top 10 Indian Songs of 2021 –

1. Kutti Story [Master] (Tamil)
2. Lagan Laagi Re [Songs of Love – Amit Trivedi] (Hindi)
3. Raataan Lambiyan [Shershaah] (Hindi)
4. Leharaayi [Most Eligible Bachelor] (Telugu)
5. Nenjame [Doctor] (Tamil)
6. Saranga Dariya [Love Story] (Telugu)
7. Rang Lageya (Hindi)
8. Lut Gaye (Hindi)
9. Aashiqui Aa Gayi [Radhe Shyam] (Hindi version)
10. Theerame [Malik] (Malayalam)


Top 10 International Songs of 2021 –

1. Amaraya (Lucky Ali x Botzer)
2. The World We Left Behind (KSHMR x Karra)
3. Astronaut in the Ocean (Masked Wolf)
4. Anita (Armin van Buuren x Timmy Trumpet)
5. Gone Are The Days (Kygo x James Gillespie)
6. Cadillac (Morgenshtern x Eldzhey)
7. Sorry (Alan Walker x ISAK)
8. Follow You (Imagine Dragons)
9. On The Way (Russ)
10. Sideways (Illenium x Valerie Broussard x Nurko)


Soundtrack Album of the Year – Zack Snyder’s Justice League


Top 5 Indian TV Shows of 2021 –

1. TVF’s Aspirants
2. Ray
3. Aarya 2
4. Potluck
5. Jeet ki Zid


Top 10 International Shows of 2021 –

1. Schitt’s Creek
2. Cobra Kai
3. Only Murders in the Building
4. Succession S3
5. Mare of Easttown
6. Dave
7. The White Lotus
8. Down to Earth with Zac Efron
9. Midnight Mass
10. What We Do in the Shadows


Top 10 Podcasts of 2021 –

1. My First Million
2. Sway/ Pivot
3. Armchair Expert
4. HBO’s Succession Podcast
5. Naan Curry
6. Renegades: Born in the USA
7. The Ranveer Show
8. Cyrus Says
9. Variety Awards Circuit
10. The Big Shots – Dosa King


Top 5 Performances of the Year –

1. Fahadh Faasil (Joji/ Malik)
2. Sushmita Sen (Aarya 2)
3. Andrew Garfield (tick, tick… BOOM)
4. Vicky Kaushal (Sardar Udham)
5. Nicolas Cage (Pig)


No Resolutions for 2022

No Resolutions for 2022

It has become a yearly ritual to make our resolutions when the new year is upon us; some people don’t start something if it’s October or November, thinking they’ll make it as a resolution and then start on January 1st.

One of the biggest drop rates in the entire world is that of new year resolutions because even if there’s a miracle and someone starts on the first of the new year, they don’t get past the fourth or the fifth day continuing the same. What’s the use of these resolutions then?

Moreover, from what we have seen in the last two years, or rather what this pandemic has taught us is to not set extremely high expectations for such short periods of time.

Instead of seeing our progress in a yearly pattern, and expecting to tick-off our wishlist items in a particular year, how about an approach of no resolutions for 2022?

For context, your daily progress and your life progress is still something you’d count, but just not in terms of a year, nor setting January 1st or 365 days as the target. Daily progress to understand how you get better or improve or just do something every day; life progress means to have a vision in mind and to walk on that path, and evaluating that path as a whole, thus not settling to have a year as a backdrop for the progress path.

Now, instead of relying on these “traditional norms” of new year resolutions, progress is still important to you, but now you have no expectations or pressure or delays or time limits irrespective of how a particular year turns out to be, and the occurrences of that year.

3 Lessons I learnt in 2021

3 Lessons I learnt in 2021

Before the chance to have another year to ourselves, before we plan those new year resolutions, the end of the year is that introspection time when you can look back at everything and just wonder.

Wonder how was this year for me and what did I experience through it? What were the key takeaways for me? What did I learn and what mistakes did I make?

(P. S. Having spent the last three years obsessively on mindset and self-improvement, and learning about spirituality, neuroscience, psychology, the path I walk on is a bit different from others, the observations I have and the takeaways could be quite different too)

Amongst those countless questions, you can introspect upon… You come across a few things that stayed with you, and for me, these are the 3 Lessons I learnt in 2021 that will have an impact on my life, moving forward…

3 Lessons I learnt in 2021 –

1. Your thoughts and your emotions are not you

There’s a lot that we have been through this year, with respect to the pandemic, the mental struggles, being stuck inside, battling your past demons, as well as facing the environment around you.

Amongst all of this, there are certain types of thoughts and emotions that keep erupting in your minds, ones that you necessarily wouldn’t want to have… And irrespective of what you’re doing, or the time of day, these thoughts and emotions act against you, and at those times you feel dark and negative. Sometimes you dig a deeper hole and end up having more of these thoughts or experiencing more of these emotions… And sometimes you’re able to distract yourselves (instead of actually facing them and understanding their origin, something we don’t know how to do initially).

One of my biggest learnings this year has been about this… While it’s great to experience emotions (in general) that help you gauge the current moment you’re living, and while it’s also great to have these thoughts, that help you introspect, ideate, and grow, and communicate… Neither your emotions nor your thoughts are you.

Who you are is beyond both of those things. They are a reaction to something that originates from everything you learn, and they’re temporary… Meaning, it can be manipulated based on what you consume and it can be changed based on how you proceed with that knowledge. Eventually, it flows to the next thing in a while, and what you experience at that moment is only for that brief period of time (unless it’s a lingering emotion that keeps coming to you time and again, and is creating a negative impact on you).

2. The importance of habits

This lesson which speaks about the importance of habits is connected with the first lesson too… Because, in the darkest of days and moments, when you feel you’re not having a good day, when you feel like not doing anything, when you feel what’s the point of it all… Your habits stand the test of time and help you get out of them.

Everything you do is a habit – how you wake up, what you do after, whether you work out or not, meditate or not, the type of food you eat, what do you consume and what do you talk about, your daily rituals.

So, when those moments arrive, for someone like me, I was extremely grateful to have a routine that involved working out, doing breath-work exercises, meditating, having a gratitude exercise, focusing on learning, and improving myself. Even when I didn’t feel like it, even in the darkest of moments, I understood the importance of habits which automatically gave me the push to continue with them, and helped me snap out of what I was experiencing, and helped me walk back on the path I wanted to.

3. Taking time for yourself

The pandemic has changed something in us, permanently, and that has also put this huge limelight on ourselves where we get to focus on who we are, our identity, our needs, and wants.

Amongst all the self-improvement, amongst all the habits push, and irrespective of the type of thoughts and emotions you’re having, another big takeaway from this year was the understanding of taking time out for yourself.

Take out that moment for yourself, without any kind of guilt, without any kind of judgment. That moment would be a singular one or one that lasts for a while, but if you think the right step is to have that break, then just take it. You constantly work on your personal life, your professional life, your chores, and you deserve that break, you deserve that time for yourself.

What you do with that time is equally important though. With all the media manipulation around us, it wouldn’t be right to give in that time to consume what other people are saying or doing or to just distract ourselves. Such a time should truly be for ourselves, just to snap out of everything.

While December always calls for making those new year resolutions, I think it should be for introspection, I think it should be to look back at the year you’ve lived and what can you take away from it. And these three lessons, for me, are what 2021 stood out for.

My top 10 blogs of 2021

My top 10 blogs of 2021

Writing a blog every day means at the end of the year, it comes down to 365 days and 365 blogs… And amongst all of those blogs, writing about life, mindset, self-improvement, point-of-view of looking at certain things, every now and then, a particular blog stands out from the rest. Through this post, I want to highlight a few of those

So, here are my top 10 blogs of 2021 –

1. The Hypocrisy of Free Content

With the internet at its current stage and with all of us having smartphones in our hands, at every moment of time, there is a ton of content available to us, just about everywhere.

But, our hypocrisy with free content is, we want free, but we don’t value free.

Read here.

2. Filling the Silence (Part 1) and Embracing the Silence (Part 2)

Part 1: In order to escape the mind, we fill the silence with – talking (more than usual) – music (contextual), and/or consuming content in general – activities that you don’t want to do (or anything else that one might do to fill their silence) Why do we do it though?

Read Part 1 here.

Part 2: Having spoken about escaping silence and running away from it… What can one do to embrace that silence? That golden silence is going to unlock so many things in your life, that you didn’t want to face but now you want to… How do you embrace it now?

Read Part 2 here.

3. The Accountability Exercise

Humans blame. We all do. For the tiniest of things. Everything that doesn’t turn out the way we fantasized about, the blame of that goes to someone, another individual, a group of individuals, a corporation, a government, a country, religion, or something else.

Read it here.

4. Are you buying it for yourself?

How often do you buy something? How often do you post about it on social media? Oh, you aren’t active there? How often do you tell your friends about what you bought?

We have this feeling that we really want something, then we buy it, then we’ll share it everywhere, and more often than not, the happiness of telling everyone about it takes over the happiness of having that thing.

Read it in detail here.

5. The intersection of your and others’ time

In the midst of that time management, there comes a time or many, when your time is intersected with others and their time with yours. Two scenarios, either you want their time or they want your time.

But, understanding this intersection is crucial. Because each person’s time is important.

Check it out here.

6. Your best thinking happens when you’re not thinking

How often are you on a deadline or think of this, you have scheduled a slot in your day when you will ideate on that project or that new idea or the next thing you wanted to write about, but just during those moments, you have hit the block and you feel like your brain has stopped working?

Read here.

7. 5 Questions to ask yourself at the end of the day

Every day brings with it its own set of thoughts, emotions, opportunities, ideas, problems, and much more. Every day can be the same and every day can be different, depending upon your approach.

How can you then know how did your day go? How can you evaluate each day?

Read more here.

8. Creating a system around your day

When you think deeper on it, usually the routine involves one particular habit, followed by another, and another. That chain of habits, which might include waking up and then working out, having your breakfast, getting on with your work, with a break in the middle, having a cup of tea in the evening, and so on, are linked to one another.

But we are all humans, not robots.

Read it in detail here.

9. What the optimum scenario should be like?

As the process begins, you never know what’s going to happen, how much is in your control, and how much you’d have to adapt. That means, in reality, the outcome could go from the best possible scenario to the worst possible scenario.

Read here.

10. DYOR, the new acronym we should headline

“I saw this person buy ‘x,’ so I bought it too.”
“I heard from person D that ‘y’ is the next big thing to look out for”
“Topic ‘Z’ keeps trending from time to time, so maybe it’s what I should get into”

In order to “save time”, people nowadays jump the line and just follow/ do what someone else is doing.

Check it out here.


If what you read interests you, then you can get the future blogs on your mail too – here’s the link for it – https://mailchi.mp/3a6c9ce52d13/rth24subscribe



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The Last 7 Days #94 (20.12 – 26.12)

With another Sunday, here’s the 94th edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.

Since the content I consume around the topics of mindset, marketing and movies brought me value, I decided to share that with you as well, through these weekly editions.

If any of the below-mentioned topics interest you, let’s chat – @rth24 on Instagram.


What To Read:

  1. Why 2021 felt worse than 2020, and how to feel better in 2022? Read more here.
  2. 21 really good things that happened in 2021, posted by Mashable. Check it out here.
  3. 5 things everyone was talking about in 2021 (AdAge). Read here.
  4. Chicken Biryani, Samosa Most-Binged Foods Of 2021, Says Swiggy. Read the entire list here.
  5. What Are POAPs and Why Are They Important? Read it here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. Bloomberg’s Lucas Shaw joins Recode’s Peter Kafka to sort what changed, what didn’t, and what 2022 might bring in the media world, in particular the movie business, streaming, music, TikTok on the Recode Media podcast. Listen to it here.
  2. Gary Vaynerchuk unpacks the “eureka!” moment when he first realized NFTs were about to change everything, plus how big brands and small influencers can be smart with this “goldrush” moment. Also, why this is the biggest consumer shift since Web 2.0. Listen here.
  3. Gaurav Kapur talks about creativity, understanding your passion, the reality of it, being a creative entrepreneur, and so much more, on Stupid No Mor by Anshu Mor. Check it out here.
  4. Director Adam McKay discusses his new film, Don’t Look Up, with fellow director Barry Jenkins in a Q&A at the DGA Theater in Los Angeles. You can listen to it on The Director’s Cut podcast here.
  5. On Variety Awards Circuit, Andrew Garfield discusses playing Jonathan Larson in the new musical film Tick Tick Boom from director Lin-Manuel Miranda, his preparation for the role, and his perspective on what he has accomplished. Listen here.

What To Watch:

  1. MKBHD is back with the 2021 edition of the Smartphone Awards. Which one won the phone of the year? Which phone has the best camera? Best design? Check it out here.
  2. Apple’s Emmy-winning comedy series, Ted Lasso has released a brand-new holiday-themed animated short, which features the entire main cast. Watch it here.
  3. On EW, Keanu Reeves, Carrie-Anne Moss, Jonathan Groff, Priyanka Chopra, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, and Jessica Henwick break down what it was like to film the newest Matrix film, ‘The Matrix Resurrections‘. Watch here.
  4. On Film Companion, Deepika Padukone chats about her cinema, her singular ability to be both relatable and larger-than-life, and the stories she wants to tell now. Check it out here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Don’t Look Up (Two low-level astronomers must go on a giant media tour to warn mankind of an approaching comet that will destroy planet Earth.) Now streaming on Netflix here.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


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My Weekly Learnings #39 (19.12 – 25.12)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. “If I aired a highlight reel of your most selfish life moments and most shameful thoughts, you’d seem like an awful person. If I aired a reel of your best, kindest moments, you’d seem like a saint. But people aren’t highlight reels, and the unedited cut is always a messy mix!”

[Tim Urban]

2. – have a glass of water
– eat a fresh fruit
– defer your decision by 15 mins

The 3 step formula to know whether you are actually feeling like a cake/ chocolate/ cookie or simply giving in to the craving out of habit. [Rujuta Diwekar]

3. The desire to avoid rejection at all costs, to avoid confrontation and conflict, the desire to attempt to accept everything equally and to make everything cohere and harmonize, is a deep and subtle form of entitlement. [Mark Manson]

4. The opposite of love is not hate, it’s indifference.
The opposite of art is not ugliness, it’s indifference.
The opposite of faith is not heresy, it’s indifference.
And the opposite of life is not death, it’s indifference.

Elie Wiesel

5. We spend too much time trying to change people’s minds and too little energy aiming to open them.

Changing minds assumes they’re wrong. You’re pushing them to accept your views.

Opening minds assumes there’s more to learn. You’re inviting them to question their views. [Adam Grant]

RTHReviews: Don’t Look Up

RTHReviews: Don’t Look Up

Those familiar with Adam McKay’s works know the subtleties in his storyline and the volume they speak, and Don’t Look Up is no exception to that.

(Here’s the official synopsis: Two low-level astronomers must go on a giant media tour to warn mankind of an approaching comet that will destroy planet Earth.)

How he has approached the film is simply excellent, the satire is impeccable. The film talks about climate change without even referring to it, whilst also quietly taking a dig on the left-wing vs right-wing of politics, and how people are so easily manipulated… I mean the film touches upon so many points and can be applied to so many categories, it’s just brilliant.

It’s quite interesting right from the get-go, freaking hilarious, and you simultaneously feel the underlying disappointment beneath the laughter too, something you understand when you watch it.

What else makes this film such a great watch? THE CAST. You’re seeing these faces after such a long time and all of them together is just applaud-worthy. Leonardo DiCaprio with another excellent performance, Jennifer Lawrence does what she does best, Meryl Streep just killed it in her role… And Jonah Hill’s comic timing is everything, whilst it’s difficult to single out one individual performance in this collective effort, Jonah Hill was just too good in his role.

The takeaway from the film, the perspective, speaks a lot, especially when compared to the reality we live in. The meta approach was another plus point, and well, there’s only so much you can appreciate about a film… Truly one of the great films of 2021.

RTHReviews: The Matrix Resurrections

RTHReviews: The Matrix Resurrections

Whether you’ve seen the original Matrix trilogy or not, everyone has heard of the franchise or at least seen the memes everywhere on the Internet. Even though the two sequels weren’t as good as the first one, what made the trilogy great and successful is the concept they introduced with the film, the meaning of it, how it relates to the reality we live, and the questions that popped up after watching it. Not to mention the spiraling storyline where your mind just spun with everything that was to be absorbed and the fantastic performances from the original trio, Neo (Keanu Reeves), Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss), and Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne).

So, when after all these years, there were talks of a fourth film in the franchise, a continuation and not a reboot of some kind, I was super excited for this one and that excitement only peaked when the trailer was launched. Now that it’s here, did it deliver?

(Here’s the official synopsis of the film: To find out if his reality is a physical or mental construct, Mr. Anderson, aka Neo, will have to choose to follow the white rabbit once more. If he’s learned anything, it’s that choice, while an illusion, is still the only way out of — or into — the Matrix. Neo already knows what he has to do, but what he doesn’t yet know is that the Matrix is stronger, more secure, and far more dangerous than ever before.)

The fans were curious about The Matrix Resurrections, released after 18 years since the last one came out, and how are they going to continue the storyline after everything that unfolded in the third part, The Matrix Revolutions. But, alas, this one plays heavily on nostalgia and that’s it. It felt more of the repackaging of the first one, other than unpacking a few elements that explain why this is the fourth part, but other than that, there’s nothing new.

The thing about the Matrix is, people complained a lot when the second and third ones were out, and over time there was acceptance with the flaws of it, and there’s a chance the same could happen with this one too. This conclusion isn’t the same for all, who are quite delighted with what The Matrix Resurrections turned out to be.

Sure, there are some really cool moments in the film, which makes you realize why you love this franchise so much. Another aspect that I really appreciated was the meta-ness of the film and the entire approach towards it. While the new cast members, in particular, Jessica Henwick and Jonathan Groff were excellent to watch, and Groff’s take on the iconic Agent Smith role was fabulous to watch, I felt the performances of all others was kind of a let-down.

Maybe it was the heavy expectations with how we approached the film, and maybe with another watch, there could be more to appreciate, but right now, apart from some of the cool moments, and the meta approach, there was nothing more to like in this. Talking about those cool moments, there was definite nostalgia with some of the iconic moves and dialogues and moments in general, and it was great to watch them, after all these years, but that still doesn’t make it the only factor to like this one. Hopefully, if there’s ever a fifth one, we can actually move ahead with the storyline, if there’s ever a way to do so.

“The Week was such a Blur”

“The Week was such a Blur”

A statement we have heard so much of, not only from others, but we have probably said it a gazillion times too, “the week was such a blur”.

We’ve said it, but have we understood why do we say it? Moreover, what does it even mean? There are two scenarios that explain it the best though.

The thing about a routine and the muscle memory of a habit is, as a combination, you get the job at hand done, but because you’ve done it a bunch of times, now you’re in a place where you are able to do it subconsciously (same steps repeated with the same momentum). (meaning you aren’t in the conscious state of mind during those moments).

To that muscle memory, the routine, and the subconscious state of mind, add the other times when you’re heavily invested in a topic, where all your senses are engaged in that particular thing and you aren’t aware of anything else.

Mix those two scenarios and you’ve got a deadly combination where you have no idea how the time flew by, and at the end of the week, the thought pops up in your head, “this week has been such a blur.”

Podcasts that caught my eye in 2021

Podcasts that caught my eye in 2021

The thing about podcasts is not everyone has an ear for them. That’s understandable. Some like to read, some like to listen, some like to watch, some are interested in all three formats. There are over 2.5 million podcasts globally, and maybe more, some hit the charts, some have a niche audience, and some are still building. Moreover, there are all kinds of podcasts – educational, entertainment, sports, music, interviews, business; there are short-form formats as well as some that go really long – but I don’t think there’s not a podcast in any category you can possibly think of.

I think of myself as a podcasting connoisseur, following over 250 shows, and listening to 30 – 40 episodes on average per week, recommending my top 5 episodes to listen to every week (in my weekly The Last 7 Days post). But, as I listen to my favorite ones, listening to some for fun, and learning in-depth with some, also experimenting with the new ones… I have got a varied taste, so there’s no one genre that I only listen to. The point being, I think I have a few good podcasts that I can recommend, considering this is the end of 2021, would love to share a few that caught my eye this year.

Here’s the list –

A. My First Million

A podcast where the hosts, Shaan Puri & Sam Parr brainstorm new business ideas based on trends & opportunities we see in the market. Sometimes we have famous guests, and they do it with us.

Check it out here and here’s their Spotify link.

B. Pivot

Recode’s Kara Swisher and NYU Professor Scott Galloway offer sharp, unfiltered insights into the biggest stories in tech, business, and politics. They make bold predictions, pick winners and losers, and bicker and banter like no other.

Check it out on Spotify here.

C. Huberman Lab

Hosted by Dr. Andrew Huberman, The Huberman Lab Podcast discusses neuroscience: how our brain and its connections with the organs of our body controls our perceptions, our behaviors, and our health.

Check it out here.

D. Armchair Expert

Armchair Expert is a weekly podcast hosted by American actors Dax Shepard and Monica Padman. Each podcast features Shepard and Padman interviewing celebrities, journalists, and academics about “the messiness of being human”.

Find it on Spotify here.

E. HBO’s Succession Podcast

The official podcast about the HBO Original series Succession. Each week journalist and host Kara Swisher unpacks real world events that echo the saga unfolding on screen. Guests include top journalists, writers, psychologists, as well as some of the people involved in making the TV show.

Listen to it here.

F. Life Kit

Everyone needs a little help being a human. From sleep to saving money to parenting and more, they talk to the experts to get the best advice out there.

Check it out here.

G. Renegades: Born in the USA

Renegades: Born in the USA is a series of conversations between President Barack Obama and Bruce Springsteen about their lives, music, and enduring love of America—despite all its challenges.

Find it on Spotify here.

H. The Big Shots – Dosa King

An epic drama about the exponential rise of P Rajagopal, the founder of Saravana Bhavan, and the shocking scandal that led to his fall.

Check it out here.


Honorary Mentions

(those that I’ve been listening to for a while now and are just excellent even after such a long time)

  • The GaryVee Audio Experience
  • The Daily Stoic
  • Cyrus Says
  • The School of Greatness
  • SmartLess
  • Snacks Daily

Am I the one who’s really making that choice?

Am I the one who’s really making that choice?

Heads or Tails?
Black or White?
Left or Right?

All our life, at every turn, at every point, we’re always making a choice.

Even if a single aspect of what we relate with matches a particular side, we go ahead with that. Not to forget past associations and prejudices that fill our minds when that is decided.

But, with every choice we make also comes a bunch of responsibilities as well. So one must ask themselves a few questions…

Can that individual delay their response, or rather take their time before choosing?

Can a particular individual understand both the sides thoroughly before making that choice?

Can an individual not worry about the aftermath whilst making that choice? Can they not worry about what people will think?

Can the individual be free of all media manipulation whilst making that choice?

Can they be devoid of all pressure of choosing a particular side?

Time and again, without thinking about such questions, the answers to these very same questions haunt us sometime or other, down the line.

So, before a choice is made, you must ask yourself, am I the one who’s really making that choice?

RTHReviews: #Belfast

RTHReviews: #Belfast

Since the time of its release, the film’s making quite a buzz around the circuit and everyone’s just raving about it. And having watched it, now I understand why.

Belfast speaks so much, but with so much love and kindness, and overall, it’s such a raw and emotional film. With the semi-autobiographical approach, Sir Kenneth Branagh has captured the essence of the film so beautifully and the output is just brilliant to watch.

(Here’s the official synopsis of the film: A semi-autobiographical film which chronicles the life of a working class family and their young son’s childhood during the tumult of the late 1960s in the Northern Ireland capital.)

While the entire cast is so good with their performances, and their relationships in the film are so heartwarming, the center point of the film remains Jude Hill’s performance. He’s so natural with his role, you’d confuse it for a documentary.

You’re seeing the film with his eyes, and how he sees the world. And that perspective from the eyes of a child is what makes this such a great thing to watch.

Belfast is beautiful, the essence of the relationships amongst the kind of environment around is enthralling to watch and is a definite contender in the awards season.

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The Last 7 Days #93 (13.12 – 19.12)

With another Sunday, here’s the 93rd edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.

Since the content I consume around the topics of mindset, marketing and movies brought me value, I decided to share that with you as well, through these weekly editions.

If any of the below-mentioned topics interest you, let’s chat – @rth24 on Instagram.


What To Read:

  1. From Spotify hits to indie films, Barack Obama shares his favorite pop culture picks for 2021. Check it out here.
  2. 44 things you forgot happened in 2021. Check out the list here.
  3. Twitter names top brand tweets of 2021. Read it here.
  4. An opinion piece on ‘The Meme Stock‘. Read here.
  5. The Best Way to Hug Someone, According to Science. Check it out here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. Kara Swisher, Scott Galloway, and a handful of Friends of Pivot make some predictions about what 2022 has in store for Metaverse, China, Apple, and more. Listen to it here.
  2. On The Decoder with Nilay Patel, John Hanke, the CEO of Niantic, talks about the reality of metaverse, the role of Niantic and in particular, Pokemon Go has played in it. Listen here.
  3. In this episode of The Ranveer Show, Abhishek Bachchan opens to many personal stories about his family, more specifically his father Amitabh Bachchan, about his mindset. He also talks about the future of cinema, OTT platforms, content & more. Check it out here.
  4. Sir Kenneth Branagh shares how his own family’s experiences influenced Belfast, his new film that focuses on adult-sized issues like ‘the troubles’ in Ireland from the perspective of a child, on The No Film School Podcast. Listen to it here.
  5. On this episode of Naan Curry, the hosts explore India’s favorite healthy flour – Besan, the source of Besan, the difference between chickpea flour and Besan, health benefits, and more. Check it out here.

What To Watch:

  1. EW gathered the ‘Spider-Man: No Way Home‘ stars Tom Holland, Zendaya, and Jacob Batalon for a SPOILER-FREE conversation about what life was like while making their new Marvel movie. Watch it here.
  2. Max Verstappen, World Champion Formula 1 2021 sat down together with his dad Jos Verstappen and David Coulthard the day after his historic victory in Abu Dhabi, breaking down the season in detail, his mindset throughout the season, and the moments of glory and disappointments in 2021. Check it out here.
  3. 16 Smartphones. Which one wins the Blind Smartphone Camera Test of 2021, on MKBHD’s channel? Watch here.
  4. Cristiano Ronaldo and Sir Alex Ferguson reunite on camera for a conversation about communication and leadership. Check it out here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Spiderman: No Way Home (With Spider-Man’s identity now revealed, our friendly neighborhood web-slinger is unmasked and no longer able to separate his normal life as Peter Parker from the high stakes of being a superhero. When Peter asks for help from Doctor Strange, the stakes become even more dangerous, forcing him to discover what it truly means to be Spider-Man.) Now in theatres.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


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My Weekly Learnings #38 (12.12 – 18.12)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. The Social Neuroscience of Music: Understanding the Social Brain Through Human Song

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, we have seen that people can adapt quickly to ensure that their social needs are met after being forced to isolate and socially distance. Many individuals turned immediately to music, as evidenced by people singing from balconies, watching live concerts on social media, and group singing online. In this article, we show how these musical adaptations can be understood through the latest advances in the social neuroscience of music—an area that, to date, has been largely overlooked. By streamlining and synthesizing prior theory and research, we introduce a model of the brain that sheds light on the social functions and brain mechanisms that underlie the musical adaptations used for human connection. We highlight the role of oxytocin and the neurocircuitry associated with reward, stress, and the immune system. We show that the social brain networks implicated in music production (in contrast to music listening) overlap with the networks in the brain implicated in the social processes of human cognition, mentalization, empathy, and synchrony—all of which are components of herding; moreover, these components have evolved for social affiliation and connectedness. We conclude that the COVID-19 pandemic could be a starting point for an improved understanding of the relationship between music and the social brain, and we outline goals for future research in the social neuroscience of music. In a time when people across the globe have been unable to meet in person, they have found a way to meet in the music”

From: https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2021-55326-001.pdf

2. The eyes are not just two external things connected to the brain, in a very real sense, they are the brain.

Why can we say that?⠀

The retina and optic nerve are, anatomically speaking, part of the brain. And, the eye is part of the forebrain during embryological development, being essentially birthed by neurological tissue. As we grow from infants to adults, it’s the combination of the maturation of the eye working with the brain that creates perception, the ability to see well and perform perceptual-cognitive tasks.⠀

Not only is the eye-brain an integrated whole, but sighted humans are primarily visual creatures. For most of us, vision is the dominant sense used to interact with the external world. Because of this, visual processes occupy the largest amount of real estate in the cerebral cortex—this is the area of the brain that, among other things, receives and processes sensory information—with 20–30% of the cortex devoted to vision. [Neurohacker]

3. The events that make your blood boil reveal what matters most to you.

Anger rises when your core values are in jeopardy. With reflection, it becomes a mirror for seeing your principles more clearly.

With action, it becomes a map for making changes to protect what you hold dear. [Adam Grant]

4. If you put one adult’s veins, capillaries, and arteries end to end, it would stretch 60,000 miles (96560 km), which would circle the Earth two and a half times. [8fact]

5. Author and social activist bell hooks on how to love yourself:

“One of the best guides to how to be self-loving is to give ourselves the love we are often dreaming about receiving from others. There was a time when I felt lousy about my over-forty body, saw myself as too fat, too this, or too that. Yet I fantasized about finding a lover who would give me the gift of being loved as I am.

It is silly, isn’t it, that I would dream of someone else offering to me the acceptance and affirmation I was withholding from myself. This was a moment when the maxim “You can never love anybody if you are unable to love yourself” made clear sense. And I add, “Do not expect to receive the love from someone else you do not give yourself.”

Source: All About Love: New Visions (via James Clear’s newsletter)

RTHReviews: SpiderMan No Way Home (Spoilers ahead)

RTHReviews: SpiderMan No Way Home (Spoilers ahead)

this review contains spoilers

I, like many others, have been following the Marvel Cinematic Universe journey for quite a while now, first the movies, now the tv shows, everything. So when the first news came of this film, and bit by bit, the news and the trailers came out, this was the most hyped I’ve ever been, for any Marvel or any superhero film.

How did the movie deliver and what! In mere sentences, it’s impossible to explain all the rush of emotions and goosebumps experienced throughout the film and at these specific Marvelesque moments in the film. Marvel has now reached a stage, after delivering so much, that they’re now able to go above and beyond, experimenting with film-making in the process, and the outcome is off the roof.

(Here’s a quick synopsis of the film – With Spider-Man’s identity now revealed, our friendly neighborhood web-slinger is unmasked and no longer able to separate his normal life as Peter Parker from the high stakes of being a superhero. When Peter asks for help from Doctor Strange, the stakes become even more dangerous, forcing him to discover what it truly means to be Spider-Man.)

Speaking of Spiderman: No Way Home, while the film is bigger than any of the previous Spiderman films, they’ve still managed to maintain the simplicity of Tom Holland’s Spiderman, his superpower (i.e. his heart), and how he has matured after every event he has faced.

There is so much happening in this 2 hr 28 mins masterpiece, that it’s difficult to pinpoint a mere few pointers that make it great. The film has quite successfully given respect to the Spiderman legacy, with respect to their villains and the multiple Spiderman(s), we’ve all grown up watching. Those moments and the storyline, in general, were so beautiful to watch, with a definite feeling of nostalgia, and also making you teary-eyed here and there.

Just when you thought how amazing are these villains all together, in one scene, sometimes showing their human side and at another moment, all villainy… Marvel takes the film to another level, with the introduction of Tobey Maguire and Andrew Garfield. I never thought it was ever possible, nor can I describe how extraordinary it was to watch three Spiderman together in one scene, fighting off the baddies. Not only the fights, but every scene with the three of them was a joy to watch.

Not only did it feel so nostalgic to especially see Maguire suited-up (since he was the first Spiderman we saw on the big screen), but another incredible aspect was the justice they gave to Garfield’s character, keeping in mind how ‘amazing’ he was, and how he was suddenly just cut off from his role, back then.

There’s so much happening to simply pinpoint a few things, but apart from these major appearances and this massive storyline that’s happening, the film is only so good with the equally-great performances from Benedict Cumberbatch, Zendaya, Jacob Batalon, Marisa Tomei, and all the others.

Overall speaking, as incredible as Avengers Endgame was, I don’t think a film like Spiderman: No Way Home has happened before, nor will it ever happen again. This was one of those epic moments in film history that we got to witness here with this film. (Sure, Marvel’s going to level up again, and in the future, but what other moment is going to make you nostalgic like this one).

I’m sure I’m going to later realize I didn’t mention this or I didn’t mention that in this review, only because I still haven’t wrapped my head around the film and that scene of all the three Spidermans swinging around is on a constant loop, in my head.

Relying on just one source of information

Relying on just one source of information

Widespread information all over the internet – social media platforms, websites, articles, blog posts, podcasts, videos – some true and some misleading – some factual and some spread around for fear and fun.

When you consume a piece of information, be it breaking news, or something that adds to your well of knowledge, are you willing to rely upon a single source that becomes the baseline of your awareness and your emotions and actions. (whatever information you receive, whether it affects you immediate or long-term, has an effect on your emotions and actions or even your thought process)

It’s not about how authentic the source is, but about verifying that information, plus gathering more info, if there is, so you can be sure of what you’re consuming, so you have your angles covered, so you’re up-to-date (not to tell others, but this piece of information is going to play a role in how you think and how you process your day/ life).

In this era of fast consumption, you consume so much that you’re hardly able to remember 10% of it, at max. So, either you put restrictions on how much you consume, or the other option is to consume good information, from multiple sources, so at least the 10% that you end up remembering is good information, and not something i.e. fake or misleading or created to agitate/ incite you towards something or someone.

Every individual should become a public personality

Every individual should become a public personality

Every individual should, for a brief period of time become a public personality. Maybe, it’s not everyone’s cup of tea. Maybe, someone doesn’t want that status or limelight. But even then, everyone should become one, for some time at least. Why?

What all of us, as humans, don’t realize is the amount of scrutiny one gets when there’s some limelight on them. People think they own those individuals, they have the power to make their decisions, criticize their decisions, tear them apart when they feel like it (or if there’s a media campaign going against someone).

People decide to put other individuals on a pedestal, thinking they’re special, and now when they have, they decide to take complete ownership of that individual too. When every individual faces that limelight, they’ll be able to realize how one’s not able to live as they want to, there are always eyes on every move of yours. Every decision is either applauded or looked down upon. There’s abuse, there’s bullying, there’s racism/ sexism/ and whatnot, there’s unwarranted opinions, constant rumors. There is literally nothing normal about that status other than having a few perks of getting ahead and having a megaphone to gather people around. But the downsides that generally people don’t seem to understand and those who are under that limelight seem to ignore.

When your family doesn’t know who you are, a hundred percent, then what right does anyone else have to judge another individual whom they don’t even know… But just being in the public light gives a random individual the right to do so… I don’t think so.

Every individual should, for once, experience this limelight, this status, because the kindness and the empathy that they will have after experiencing it will be enormous. Let alone the negativity, the hatred, the opinions, the gossip, and whatnot that we’ll get rid of.

Admire the story, respect the hustle and enjoy the craft… But that’s where one should probably draw the line too.

“If I’m being honest”

“If I’m being honest”

How many times have you heard someone say, “Let me be honest with you” or “If I’m being honest…”? Whenever someone has to say something sensitive or something serious, they’ll begin their sentence with those statements.

But, what does that tell you about the person who’s saying it?

Are they being honest when they say it, and they aren’t being honest the other times they converse with you?

Or are they honest every time, but they’re being extra honest now? Is there a thing such as extra honesty?

Those words when you listen to them, “If I’m being honest”, make you doubtful right from the start, and not attentive (which was initially expected from the one who made that statement). Moreover, you now perceive that individual and what they say now and what they’ve said before differently.

Maybe, it’s not even their fault. Maybe, they didn’t even notice this technicality. It could be a society thing, originated sometime in the past, and just carried on, without anyone asking any questions (as usual).

But, now that the question can be raised… Let’s think again, should we continue making such statements, “Let me be honest with you” and “If I’m being honest with you” and similar ones which come under the context of honesty. Let’s rethink the baseline of such statements, and what exactly was one trying to get away with by making such a statement…?

Controlling the flow of your thoughts

Controlling the flow of your thoughts

Have you been in a scenario where you blank out from what’s happening in front of you and your chain of thoughts is somewhere else, on a third topic altogether?

Let’s think of this… Imagine there’s a conversation going on the table, amongst those around you… And instead of listening in, you’re suddenly thinking of something that happened or something that you had to do, in that scenario you have blanked out and are consciously thinking of something else.

Or let’s say, there’s a table full of food, starters, main course, desserts, but instead of indulging in it, you’re suddenly thinking about this deadline that you had to meet and how you’d do it, etc. and you’ve consciously blanked out from the moment.

This says that irrespective of whatever’s happening, if your focus is elsewhere, and irrespective of the 40,000 to 80,000 thoughts in our head every day (some we control, some we don’t), we are having the ability to carry the flow of our consciousness and our thoughts in a certain direction.

We may not always have that control, and mostly until we learn how to, we don’t.

Even then, when we observe our patterns, it can be noticed how you can jump from one topic to another when you really want to think about something.

That power to control what you think about is with you.

When you don’t like the topic of your thought/s, you can jump around to another topic, with the criteria that it’s something that interests you, and you’re invested in that particular topic… Only then will there be some focus behind it. (or else it can be one of those thousands of thoughts that just float around without you even remembering what that thought was, in the first place).

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The Last 7 Days #92 (06.12 – 12.12)

With another Sunday, here’s the 92nd edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.

Since the content I consume around the topics of mindset, marketing and movies brought me value, I decided to share that with you as well, through these weekly editions.

If any of the below-mentioned topics interest you, let’s chat – @rth24 on Instagram.


What To Read:

  1. Allyship is Dictionary.com’s word of the year. Read more here.
  2. How to Say 2021’s Most Mispronounced Words, From Omicron to Ethereum? Check it out here.
  3. The worst buzzwords of 2021, by AdAge. Read the list here.
  4. Why Would Anyone Buy Your NFT? Read here.
  5. How tomatoes conquered Indian cooking? Check it out here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. Seth Godin riffs about money, how it is a story we tell ourselves, and the value around it, on his podcast Akimbo. Listen here.
  2. Simon Sinek talks to Tristan Harris about the power tech companies have amassed, whether they act responsibly or they abuse it, on A Bit of Optimism. Check it out here.
  3. On MFM, Shaan Puri and Sam Parr break down Mr. Beast’s Squid Games recreation and talk about how he was able to get 100M views in less than four days. They also discuss a number of business ideas including chrome extensions, building QVC for mobile, and more. Listen to it here.
  4. On F1 Beyond the Grid, ahead of his final race in Formula 1, Kimi Raikkonen joins Tom Clarkson to look back at his 20-year career: the races, the teammates, the bosses, the championship he clinched in 2007, and those he missed out on. Check it out here.
  5. Bradley Cooper joins the Armchair Expert to discuss their long-standing friendship that started at the beginning of their sobriety, exploring the mysteries of the human experiences through storytelling, and how he almost didn’t get his breakthrough role in The Hangover, and so much more. Listen here.

What To Watch:

  1. Film Companion rounds up the actors behind the finest Hindi language performances of 2021 – Vicky Kaushal, Taapsee Pannu, Sidharth Malhotra, Sanya Malhotra, Samantha Prabhu, and Adarsh Gourav discussing stardom, social media, scenes that tested their caliber, and what’s in store for them next, and much more. Watch it here.
  2. The Pepsi Paradox. Everybody loves Pepsi, but everybody buys Coca-Cola. Why? Check it out here.
  3. Rohit Shetty talks about his journey into Bollywood, his filmography, how he plans his stunts, and much more, on The Bombay Journey. Watch here.
  4. TV Show Recommendation of the Week – Hawkeye (Clint Barton and Kate Bishop shoot a few arrows and try to avoid becoming the target themselves.) Now streaming on Hotstar here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Love Story (Telugu) (A Christian Zumba instructor falls in love with a starry-eyed upper caste Hindu girl. In their quest for happiness, however, they must first overcome a massive caste divide.) Now streaming on Aha Video here.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


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My Weekly Learnings #37 (05.12 – 11.12)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. Seven signs that you’re actually the problem…
a. You feel like no one understands you.
b. You always complain you’re not appreciated.
c. You believe you rarely get the attention you deserve.
d. You assume other people have it easy while you’re barely scraping by.
e. You have little interest or curiosity in the lives of others.
f. You often fight with close friends and loved ones.
g. And it’s always their fault. [Mark Manson]

2. When people ask for your feedback, it’s a mark of respect. They value your knowledge, skill, or taste.
When they don’t hesitate to give you feedback, it’s a sign of trust. They have faith that you’ll take it as an opportunity to grow, not a threat to your ego. [Adam Grant]

3. “No man chooses evil because it is evil; he only mistakes it for happiness.” – Mary Shelley

4. We generally adopt a posture of optimism or pessimism as a response (or reaction) to external events. We see how things are unfolding and make a decision about what to expect. We feel like we need to justify our response based on the facts on the ground.

But that doesn’t actually explain why different people, similarly informed, might adopt an optimistic mood or a pessimistic one.

In fact, that mood is a choice. And it’s one that determines how we’ll behave.

Optimism is a tool that permits us to solve problems more effectively. If used wisely, it brings enthusiasm, inspiration, and hope to projects that benefit from them.

[And pessimism is a tool as well–it can help you with budgeting, scheduling, and other projects. If it works for you, that’s great. Choose your tools wisely.]

As a universal default, either mood will certainly lead to misguided energy and poor decisions. But if we can be thoughtful about optimism as a tactic, the focus, and energy it brings can solve problems that others might simply walk away from.

Our pessimism might not be an accurate diagnosis of the past. It might simply be a way we’re using to produce a future we’re not happy with. [Seth Godin]

5. The real fun of life is in living it with a mastered mind.

For those who live enslaved to their mind, life is a mere vessel of suffering. [Kunal Sarkar]

The most useless blog post

The most useless blog post

We sometimes consume the most useless content ever – in the form of articles, tweets, memes, Reels, videos, in whatever form, even if it is not adding anything to our life. We put it all under the context of “entertainment”.

We are living in a time of doomscrolling, where we end up swiping through the phone for hours, without realizing how the day has gone by, and end up calling it a busy day, instead of noticing how unproductive it truly went.

So, I write the most useless blog post today, to create that awareness around the useless content we consume, and to ask whether we should consume it or not. Should we keep following those accounts or not? What are we counting as useful and useless? What truly is entertainment?

A useless blog post to probably highlight a few useful questions that could negate the uselessness in the future.

Me, me, me

Me, me, me

Selfish intentions. Status games. Zero-sum mindset. Three words to describe an average individual today. It may be called unfair to do so, some may disagree, some may feel hurt, but either now or before (if someone has gone through a process of change), either of these attributes or all has been a part of most individuals.

Whether it comes to one’s personal life or professional life, there’s a lot of ‘me, me, me’ in those scenarios. This shouldn’t be confused with one’s time for themselves, or rather the self-care time.

This ‘me, me, me’ is about getting the attention onto oneself. It’s about ensuring that they are at the center, and they are seeking validation out of whatever they’re doing.

In such a process, there’s hardly any attention on the receiving party (either one individual or as a group), there’s no room for discussion or feedback.

The individual who focuses just on themselves, want to focus on their goal over everyone else’s, they’re ready to let someone else drop off the ladder (they might be the one pulling them off too), just so they could climb higher up. In their mind, their loss means someone else’s win and if they have to win, means they’ll take extreme measures.

The cost of that win is isolation from everyone else. The cost is a victory with walking over others.

There’s another group of people too. ‘We, we, we’.
It’s not that they don’t want to win. They definitely want to. But, they also want to make sure that it’s not at the cost of anyone else. They don’t want to hurt anyone else in the process. They don’t want to walk over someone else. If someone is about to fall off the ladder, they might take a step down, just so they could save someone else and then reach the top of the ladder together.

The ‘we, we, we’ people are ones who understand that life is not zero-sum, they know that feeling good about their life and wanting to succeed isn’t a zero-sum game. They want to go ahead and also ensure they help others to do so. It’s a team effort game. They don’t care how they look or how they must behave. It’s lesser about the status, it’s more about humanity.

You’ll see less of these people around, but to find even one of those traits in someone else is a joyful thing, when you notice it (i.e. if you’re one with the similar traits too), or else the ‘me, me, me’ people aren’t getting along with the ‘we, we, we’ people.

It’s not about being in either of the brackets and then fighting with one other, but about walking together, solving problems together, less of who’s doing what, and more of what can we do together (less stress, less anxiety, lesser problems in this scenario).

Is your first idea the best idea?

Is your first idea the best idea?

You are thinking of an idea. Maybe, for a project, or for your company, or for your book or your post or your video, or an idea to solve any kind of a problem. You could be ideating for anything.

You are thinking and thinking, and suddenly an idea strikes you. Either because of the delay in thinking of the idea, or just that the idea seems interesting (at first), you’re now all excited about it. You have found that idea you’re looking for, and now you’re ready to proceed to the next step.

But, unfortunately, that excitement also clouds your mind of clarity. Because you’re already thinking of that next step, you’re aren’t thinking of that idea, in particular, with enough mental clarity and space.

Sometimes, while that idea excites you, you aren’t able to see the flaws in it (especially in the first instance). You aren’t able to see what’s wrong with the idea, how it could fail, and what can you do to rectify that. Maybe the idea is right, but there could be potential issues when it comes to its execution. Maybe that idea isn’t expressable. Maybe it’s right only in your head. There could be a thousand explanations as to what could be wrong with that first idea.

That doesn’t mean you give up though, not at all!

The point of this process is to not stop at the first step but to keep reiterating your idea. The more you reiterate that idea, instead of expressing your feelings that you finally had the idea, or jumping to the next step, you will be able to sit with it for some time and start observing its complexities.

How does this idea sound in my head? How would it sound when expressed to someone else? Is it understandable? Is it simple or complex? Am I able to break it down in simpler terms? What is the extent of this idea?

When you reiterate, you’re able to ask more questions and mix that with the time you’ve given yourself, plus the clarity with which you’re sitting with it, all the ingredients now add up to you refining that idea into something better and enhanced.

Now, you have an idea worth proceeding with.

DYOR, the new acronym we should headline

DYOR, the new acronym we should headline

With so much information available on the internet, especially from the rise in creators and them sharing information (plus the clickbait videos and headlines that tell you what to do, etc), what has also changed is people want everything just handed over to them.

“I saw this person buy ‘x,’ so I bought it too.”
“I heard from person D that ‘y’ is the next big thing to look out for”
“Topic ‘Z’ keeps trending from time to time, so maybe it’s what I should get into”

In order to “save time”, people nowadays jump the line and just follow/ do what someone else is doing. Sure, someone may be sharing good information. Sure, that individual’s voice must be credible. But that doesn’t mean what is right for them is what’s right for you too.

Time and again, I’ve personally done this, as well as keep noticing other people do it when you jump in the pool without knowing whether you can swim or not. Sooner or later, you may start drowning if you don’t know how to swim.

That’s the reason I want to highlight this new acronym, not used in the mainstream world, but one that would keep telling us to be on the right path, and do what’s right for us.

D.Y.O.R.

Do Your Own Research.

It’s not wrong to check what’s trending or why is it trending. It’s not wrong to follow a creator of any sector, nor is it wrong to listen to what they’re telling you. You may end up with some really good information.

But, said all of that, when you want to get into a new sector, something you aren’t entirely sure of, something that you don’t have enough knowledge of, do your own research.

Get as much information as you can. Research as much as possible. Understand what you’re getting into. Get your facts right. Find out why it’s the hot topic, or why it will be. Now when you know the a to z of a subject, you’re more prepared and ready to jump in the pool, because now you have the right knowledge of how to swim, plus you’re also carrying the right accessories with you.

Instead of relying on someone else and being dependent on them to keep you updated, or waiting until it’s too late for you, start with the most basic step of putting in the time and work, do your own research and knowing whether it (whatever that topic/ subject) is right for you or not, whether it’s what you want or not, and then ultimately, if things go wrong, instead of making those excuses and blames, you could be accountable for your own mistakes, and if things go right, you could be glad that you took the right step because you had all the information.

An honest review of how the blog has helped me over 1000 blog posts

An honest review of how the blog has helped me over 1000 blog posts

Two years ago, I was in quite a different space than now. Today, I’m obsessed with self-improvement, curious about life and looking at it from a lens of spirituality, neuroscience, psychology, physiology, philosophy; the importance of traits such as empathy, kindness, courage, determination and so many more, and yet back then I didn’t know any of it, nor had even heard of it.

14th March 2019, I had posted my first blog post. I knew I wanted to post every day, but I didn’t know that one day I’d be writing my 1000th blog post too.

Now when I look back at those posts, especially from the perspective of today, I can see a massive difference in not only how I used to write, but also how I used to think, the depth of what I knew about a subject, and the limitations around it too.

Back then, when I was starting to learn these new topics and started walking on this path (still learning), I had a plethora of thoughts around this space, and just writing about all of it gave me this platform to explore more and look at things I never thought of exploring for even a minute.

The more I wrote, the deeper I could explore a particular topic, micro, and macro. The more questions that arose in my mind, the more curious I got, and the more answers I sought. The more information I received, I understood there’s no limitation or an end to these topics, just that the more you explore and understand, the freer and better life you’re able to live.

How did the blog help me then?
– First and foremost, simply instilling the habit of writing a blog helped me build other habits and maintain them, day after day. Executing one habit was the confidence builder to go through with the other habits too, especially in the initial days.

– There were low days, or even days when I just didn’t feel to write anything, but the determination to maintain the schedule and to keep it going gave me the push to write. Not just that though, this simple exercise helped me with the push towards other areas of my life as well, and maybe without that initial push elsewhere (in my case, writing the blog), it could’ve affected my entire approach too.

– To write every day, means to have a ton of ideas and knowledge of what you want to write about. For me, it meant to constantly be present, be aware of what’s going on within me, around me, around the world, observing everything, which ultimately made me think more, understand more, and with writing as a medium, helped me grow as an individual and expand my perspective.

– They say, reading/ learning is stage one of acquiring information. Writing about it is stage two when you’re able to go deeper into the process. When you write your thoughts, you’re able to truly understand what you know and how much do you know. Well, writing definitely did that, because it made me realize my limitations and helped me expand my boundaries.

– Most people who write aren’t looking for validation towards what they’ve written or how good it is, but to create an impact with those words and those learnings. A few times, I’ve had the fortune of receiving information from the other end about the same, how what I’ve written and shared made an impact on what the other person was going through, or simply what they wanted to read at that moment. (I’ve first-hand experienced that and am glad to be a part of that process with others as well)

– The concept of compounding. We may have learnt about the concept financially, but its use case is seen in every area of life. The more you put in something, the more outputs it will provide (multiplying in the future). In the simple scenario of writing a thousand blog posts, while the process of ideating grows difficult with every stage of information you uncover, the compounding takes place in the form of looking at myself, looking at humans all around, looking at human behavior, looking at the world, and how much of it is real, how much can be changed, and how many are just playing robots and the role each individual plays in it.

Sure, a thousand blog posts may not be a big thing. Sure, blogging could’ve become outdated. Sure, who reads anymore (maybe)? But, as a start, as a medium, and as an outlet, this blog has played an extraordinary role for me, throughout this process of growth and change and evolving, and hopefully, that process continues as I write more and share more of my perspective and learnings into the world.

Thank you for reading it!

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The Last 7 Days #91 (29.11 – 05.12)

With another Sunday, here’s the 91st edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.

Since the content I consume around the topics of mindset, marketing and movies brought me value, I decided to share that with you as well, through these weekly editions.

If any of the below-mentioned topics interest you, let’s chat – @rth24 on Instagram.


What To Read:

  1. The internet’s third chapter is coming. Read more here.
  2. What are DAOs? Here’s what to know about the ‘next big trend’ in crypto. Check it out here.
  3. How To Get The Most Out Of Your Best Habits? Read here.
  4. MrBeast’s ‘Real Life Squid Game’ and the price of viral stunts. Read more here.
  5. What’s an Audio Aura? An aura expert explains Spotify Wrapped’s new feature. Check it out here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. Neil Degrasse Tyson discusses the responsibility of using your platform to champion causes you care about, how to keep your head above water when pursuing a passion until it pays the bills, and why the hell it’s taken so long for space tourism to become an industry, on Big Money Energy. Listen to it here.
  2. On Today Explained, Recode’s Rebecca Heilweil explains how humans are trashing space. A space environmentalist explains what cleanup might look like. Listen here.
  3. When a psychologist who studies well-being ends up with a brain tumor, what happens when she puts her own research into practice? Listen to it on Ted Talks Daily here.
  4. On Cyrus Says, Ashish Singhal, Founder & CEO of CoinSwitch, talks about the new Cryptocurrency Bill 2021, how CoinSwitch Kuber has evolved over the years, how crypto companies are solving real world problems, investing in crypto, and lots more. Check it out here.
  5. Hosts Lizzie Bassett and Alex Logan break down Jane Campion’s ‘The Power of the Dog‘, why you need to see it, why it’s a major Oscar contender, on IMDb is Obsessed podcast. Listen to it here.

What To Watch:

  1. On The Daily Stoic, Ryan Holiday talks to Gary Vaynerchuk about his new book Twelve and a Half, how to get comfortable with vulnerability and emotional development, the best way to maintain long-term business success, and more. Watch it here or listen to it on Spotify here.
  2. Squid Game recreated in real-life, with 456 contestants and a $456,000 prize money, by MrBeast. Watch it here.
  3. Nuseir Yassin aka Nas Daily chats about work, life, his inspiration, money, and more on the Curly Tales episode of Sunday Brunch. Check it out here.
  4. TV Show Recommendation of the Week – All or Nothing: Juventus (An exploration of the highs and lows of the Turing-based Juventus football club in the 2020/21 season as they strive for victory in the Italian Premier League under the guidance of Massimiliano Allegri.) Now streaming on Amazon Prime here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Sardar Udham (Based on the life of Sardar Udham Singh, a revolutionary freedom fighter best known for assassinating Michael O’Dwyer in London to take revenge for 1919 Jallianwala Bagh massacre in Amritsar.) Now streaming on Amazon Prime here.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


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My Weekly Learnings #36 (28.11 – 04.12)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. Your brain has a limited capacity to store readily accessible information. This storage is called ‘Working Memory’ and the ability to utilize this working memory is called Attention. Think of it as your shopping trolley. It only has a fixed amount of space. And if you fill it up, and something important comes up, something has to leave the trolley to make space.Another way to think of this is that attention is a torch. A torch can only illuminate a certain amount of things in your environment. Wherever you turn that circle of light becomes visible to you while the rest of the world disappears.

We can only pay attention to a fixed number of things, which makes attention a precious resource. And like every other precious resource, everyone wants a piece of it. Your friends, family, boss, employees, the supermarket, amazon, Netflix, cricket, news channels, social media, your health apps, even your watch. Everything and everyone is competing for that precious attention of yours. [Siddharth Warrier]

2. Discipline is cheaper than regret. [Shane Parrish]

3. We develop low-level addictions to junk that fuels our insecurities: junk information, junk activities, junk friends. Quitting means exposing emotions and triggering weird cravings but the goal is to stay focused on things that add value to your life. [Mark Manson]

4. ‘The first one never knows’
The first sponsor of an American TV sitcom was Anacin.

At the time they did it, no one had any idea how many people watched TV or would watch a sitcom.

They had no way to measure what they would get for their sponsorship dollars because it was a new and untested medium.

But Anacin tried it anyway.

In an attempt to measure the size of the audience, they offered viewers the chance to get a free mirror if they wrote a letter after seeing the show.

The company guessed 200 people might send a letter and bought 400 mirrors just to be safe.

They wound up getting more than 8,000. [For the Interested Newsletter]

5.

Source: lizandmollie

The introspection at the end of every year

The introspection at the end of every year

We live our life a certain way, and every day is us living a routine. A routine where we approach the weekdays and weekends a certain way, our thoughts and actions a certain way, the perspective of looking at us and the world a certain way.

Days turn into weeks, weeks turn into months, and just like that, it’s December with another year upon us. You have the ability to plan or change the plan mid-way, anytime you want, you can wish to change right here right now. But, all said and done, there’s something about the year-end (probably because we see time with a yearly pattern to measure our lives) that makes us introspect our lives and the year that we have lived.

In January, you will see the last 30 days of everything that transpired. In May, you’ll see the last 30 days of everything that happened with you. But, December is the time of the month, when you look at the entire year, and how it transpired, and what came out of it for you.

How was this year for me?
How will I see this year?
Was it satisfactory?
Was it painful?
Did it create growth for me?
Were there any downfalls?
What lessons can I take from all of this?
What were the best moments of the year?
5 years down the line, how am I going to remember this year?

If you’re introspecting, you should definitely ask the tough questions and wonder what kind of answers do you come up with, if any.

Before the chance to have another year to ourselves, before having the chance to rectify our mistakes, or to expand what’s working, before we plan those new year resolutions, the end of the year is that introspection time when you can look back at everything and just wonder.

This introspection allows that chance to change before the change is forced upon us. It provides the chance to make the move before we have to forcefully move. It is the time to introspect, do you have the time for it?

My first-time experience of buying an NFT

My first-time experience of buying an NFT

There’s no denying that Web3, Crypto, Blockchain, and NFTs (to name a few) are the future we’re going to be a part of (and the glimpses of that reality are already being seen for a while now).

Those sectors and what’s being built have been quite intriguing to me, for a while now. Whilst I haven’t dabbled into any of it, I have been closely watching everything that has been happening, and trying to learn and understand it all.

Anyone who has some knowledge about the space knows how much it has skyrocketed in the last 12 months, especially the NFT space (there’s such a massive difference to what the space was in 2020 or even 2019).

While I missed out on a few projects, and a few that were just out of my reach, I definitely wanted to get into something that personally excited me (apart from just sorting out what’s authentic and what’s not), and something that was maybe different than the rest.

I’ve been a massive Matrix fan, and a Keanu Reeves fan, so when I heard an official NFT project is coming out based on that, it got me all juiced up and I knew it’s going to be my first foray into the NFT world.

Powered by Epic Games, and with Warner Bros officially into the picture, this project seemed bigger right from the start. A 100,000 avatar drop, with the user being given the option to choose the red pill vs the blue pill (at a later date), and henceforth the journey would begin. (a journey with missions that would unlock points, more NFTs, and of course, more has to be unveiled, with this being a multi-year experience project.)

30th November’21 was to be the minting date; with initially 25 avatars that could possibly be minted per user per day. 100,000 seemed like a big number, where the demand for it was questionable at first, and whether the project would be that big or not (something that wasn’t just on my mind, but on the minds of other community members too).

Jump to getting the wallet ready, with all the setup done and it’s the D-day. Around 10 to 20 thousand people on Discord, everyone wondering how the project is going to turn out.

Only did we know, that the before-scenario and the after-scenario were going to be totally different. As the time was getting nearer, more and more people started getting in the community chat. By the time users had to check-in for the queue, there were more than 60,000 people waiting to get in as well.

Now the thought of the moment was, if the first 4,000 people mint 25 avatars each, then the 100,000 drops are done there, and then, and the rest of us are saying goodbye. Just during those moments, I get my queue position at 27,885th place (a number I’ll remember for a long time because I ended up seeing it for a long, long time).

As people start buying, there’s such a server load with the number of people queueing up, that the whole process is apparently paused for a few hours (until they sort things out from their end). Amongst all of this, and as time passes by, their Discord has jumped up to 50,000+ users and the queue is up 100,000+ people. (let’s not forget that the total drop is 100,000 avatars).

People start getting frustrated and complain about the buy-in per person, and ultimately they reduce the per-person buy-in from 25 avatars each to 5. But, the queue is still on pause. They try to resume, but another issue pops up, and thus, put back on pause.

Being in India, this is a late-night for us here, so all of this is happening from 12 am – 1 am here. One tab has the queue on pause, another tab has discord open, and another tab has their Twitter Spaces live session going on. (there was a lot of excitement about the project)

The queue is still on pause, and even when it opens, let’s not forget, my queue position is 27,885 (the number stuck on my screen for hours now), so it was going to take a lot of time. Now, I’m just pondering what should I even do, at this time? Should I even stay awake?

So, it’s decided… The laptop’s on beside me, while I take quick naps in-between and keep checking the progress. I may have slept for 15 minutes, then immediately checked the progress, checked Discord for updates, and then back to a quick nap again, and that was what the whole night looked like for me.

I wake up around 6 am in the morning, to check that the queue is halfway there… Around 15 to 20 thousand people have minted their avatars, and after 7,000 more people (roughly), I’d be up for my turn. And while my position is 27,885, there are about 100,000 more people behind me waiting for their turn, with the last queue position updated at about 140,000th spot.

Now, as time passes by, seconds turn into minutes, and quickly two hours have passed, but I’m closer than ever, and there’s no time to take a breather.

Around 9.15 AM IST, my turn is up. While people complained a lot about the process all night long, regarding payment issues, transaction issues, and whilst all of that worried me, it took me a minute to complete my process, and there, the transaction was done.

My first (bought) NFT!

My first Matrix NFT!

It was supposed to take some time for the avatars to show up in my wallet, but the main part was done. I could finally get on with my day (something the others couldn’t say, as they still awaited their turn all day long).

That queue had crossed 200,000 people, and after a while, they had paused the process for the whole night (their time) to then resume the next day, and while that happened, eventually, it was all sold out.

Simultaneously, while I kept checking, my avatars had dropped.

probably nothing.

Now, the actual process begins.

To either take the red pill or the blue pill, on December 16.

And the missions they have planned after that.

Avoiding the Outcome

Avoiding the Outcome

Knowingly or unknowingly, we do a lot of things, under the pretense of enjoyment, entertainment, relaxation, hustle, consumption, or achievements.

Throughout that process, or with our eyes on the destination, we focus on the now, we want to enjoy the now.

No problem with that scenario, except we have to focus on what the outcome will look like too.

Some of these things that we do, quickly become habits and eventually becomes our lifestyle, i.e. how we live our life. Our actions are behind-the-scenes building up towards the outcome, without us noticing anything in the present.

We live, we do these actions (and habits), and go on. We see today, but not a year from today, or 10 days from today.

Without having that balanced perspective of looking at things, (the balance includes enjoying the now AND understanding the kind of outcome that will come out of it), the scale then tips off on either side causing results based on where it’s weighed.

Where we enjoyed the present, in the future, we would have to live with its consequences, i.e. the outcome of those actions. How long can you then say, I enjoyed that time and now I’ll live with the outcome too, because that outcome, whatever it turns out to be, and the area of life where it affects you, eventually you’ll then have to live with that too.

So without that balanced perspective, the question then arises…

Can we avoid the outcome of our actions?

To avoid the outcome, whether now, or in the near future, or in the long-term, the outcome will certainly take place, except when you take care of your actions and understand the intent and impact of them (and eventually start balancing it out).

Quick Reactions

Quick Reactions

With all our senses at work, we consume information at a rate that’s just unimaginable.

We are constantly processing everything that happens. What’s happening in the present, what have we thought beforehand that should’ve happened, and what the next step should be, everything is being processed simultaneously.

Amongst all of this, when any kind of particular situation occurs, with respect to an outcome, an individual, or even a self-created situation in our mind, we are quite quick to react.

That reaction often roots from the type of mindset one has, the kind of perspective with which they view themselves, and the world, and where their focus lies overall.

Averagely, these reaction times are quite quick. And these reactions are often either aggressive or defensive, pertaining to the situation.

It then results in an erupted situation which doesn’t solve anything, makes things worse, and at the same time keeps you ticked off.

When that response time is slowed down, everything can be perceived more clearly, you have more options than you’d have noticed before, you’re in control and you’re now more balanced in this scenario.

How are these quick reaction times slowed down?
– with a growth mindset,
– with a kinder and empathetic perspective of looking at the world,
– with a stiller mind (that comes with the practice of meditation and pranayama (breathing exercises))
– with a bigger focus on what you want and (understanding) what (truly) matters

When you look upon those things, what was blurred earlier becomes focused and what didn’t need to be in focus becomes blurred.

Summarizing your Writings

Summarizing your Writings

Writing has always been a skill, most people crave to have. It’s not one of those that you’re born with, but definitely, something that can be acquired, if you’re interested in it.

The importance of writing can be seen in every industry, especially the creative sectors, including the one of advertising, without which none of the brands could’ve sold anything to anyone.

So, some people write professionally, some are into copywriting, and some write for themselves too. Whether in the form of a blog, or Twitter threads, or answering questions on Quora, the content creation forms go on and on.

Writing is one skill to have, but those who are able to fine-tune that skill, and polish it, thus, being able to summarize their writings are in a rare circle who are able to create a niche skill, which very few people are able to acquire.

Writing 1000 words or 10,000 words or a book is not easy, but if you are truly interested in that subject and if you live it, then you can get going. Writing may not be good at first, there could be a few mistakes here and there, but you would still be able to write it.

But, summarizing a 1000 word post into explaining it in 2 lines or summarizing out a paragraph from a 10,000-word article is more difficult, and not everyone’s cup of tea.

These days, with the attention scarcity, people consume the information quickly, they want a quick tease, and if that interests them, then they’d be ready to consume that 10,000-word article too. To learn to summarize your writings is the next skill writers must learn, whether for their own published works, the professional work done for others, or even for their personal works too.

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The Last 7 Days #90 (22.11 – 28.11)

With another Sunday, here’s the 90th edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.

Since the content I consume around the topics of mindset, marketing and movies brought me value, I decided to share that with you as well, through these weekly editions.

If any of the below-mentioned topics interest you, let’s chat – @rth24 on Instagram.


What To Read:

  1. What to expect in year three of the pandemic? || The World Ahead 2022. Read here.
  2. What is the metaverse? How blockchain, crypto, gaming, VR, and AR are building a new way to experience the Internet? Read more here.
  3. 2022 Colour Trends: The Year’s Top Colours. Check it out here.
  4. How did the seven-day week come to rule the world? Read here.
  5. Ask yourself these 5 prejudice-fighting questions after watching any movie, says a Stanford psychologist. Check it out here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. AirBnB CEO Brian Chesky talks about how he manages and structures his company, the future of work, metaverse and cryptocurrencies, and more on The Decoder with Nilay Patel. Listen to it here.
  2. Seth Godin talks about branding vs marketing, the right approach for brands, actionable ideas, and more on Guy Kawasaki’s Remarkable People podcast. Check it out here.
  3. On My First Million, Shaan Puri and Sam Parr talk about what an early adopter mindset is and how to adopt it, the ConstitutionDAO and whether it’s a good idea, how Gary Vaynerchuk used NFTs to create the greatest preorder of all time, and more. Listen here.
  4. Fernando Alonso opens up on why racing Michael Schumacher was so special, why he wasn’t ready for their fierce championship fights in 2005 and 2006, on his rivalry with Lewis Hamilton at McLaren and the world titles he missed out on in 2007, 2010 and 2012, on F1 Beyond the Grid podcast. Check it out here.
  5. In this episode of Naan Curry, Sadaf and Archit explore India’s favorite cheese – Paneer, its health benefits, why Paneer is so versatile, and the multiple origin stories of paneer. Listen here.

What To Watch:

  1. Andrew Garfield shares how art helps him get through grief. Watch this here.
  2. In this session of FC FrontRow, Vicky Kaushal talks about his film, Sardar Udham, how he prepares for his role, preparing for characters from his own life experiences, saying no to Uri initially, and more. Check it out here.
  3. Rocky and Mayur are back with a Season 6 of #RoadTrippinWithRockyAndMayur, touring Hyderabad and Chennai. Watch it here.
  4. In this episode of “Notes on a Scene,” Andrew Garfield and ‘tick, tick…BOOM!’ director Lin-Manuel Miranda break down the scene where Jon (Garfield) gets the party started with an impromptu acapella performance of “Boho Days.” Check it out here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Tick, Tick… BOOM (Based on the autobiographical musical by playwright Jonathan Larson. It’s the story of an aspiring composer in New York City who is worried he made the wrong career choice, whilst navigating the pressures of love and friendship.) Now streaming on Netflix here.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


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My Weekly Learnings #35 (21.11 – 27.11)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. Anything that uplifts your consciousness is spirituality. Anything that brings you more peace of mind, that’s spirituality. Anything that gives you confidence, self-confidence, is spirituality. Anything that helps you to communicate better with people and anything that promotes a better understanding of yourself, of others, and of the universe, that’s spirituality. (Listen here more to understand about spirituality) [Gurudev Sri Sri Ravishankar]

2. Beware of confusing attention with admiration. Being noticed isn’t a substitute for being respected.

Don’t mistake recognition for appreciation. Knowing who you are doesn’t mean people value what you do.

The point of sharing isn’t to gain followers. It’s to make a contribution. [Adam Grant]

3. “Many people use deliberate cold exposure specifically to increase their metabolism and fat loss. Because many people also combine deliberate cold exposure with a sauna or hot showers, I asked Dr. Susanna Soeberg, Ph.D. (expert in human cold therapy science and first author on a recent landmark study about cold exposure for metabolism), whether or not heat should be done before or after cold exposure.

Dr. Soeberg’s answer is what I now call “The Soeberg Principle”: which states that even though you can alternate heat and cold *if your main goal is to increase metabolism then you should end with the cold* because it forces your body to use its own energy to heat back up.

Remember: you can still get benefits from a cold exposure if you end with heat but you won’t get as great a metabolic effect.” [Andrew Huberman]

4. The Illusion of Self

Source: grantdraws

5. Amazon’s founder, Jeff Bezos, isn’t a fan of the phrase “work-life balance.”

Bezos said new Amazon employees shouldn’t view work and life as a balancing act. Instead, Bezos said it’s more productive to view them as two integrated parts.

“It actually is a circle,” Bezos said. “It’s not a balance.”

“And my view is, that’s a debilitating phrase because it implies there’s a strict trade-off.”

“If I am happy at home, I come into the office with tremendous energy,” Bezos said. “And if I am happy at work, I come home with tremendous energy.” [Jeff Bezos via Business Insider] (Read more here)

RTHReviews: tick, tick… BOOM

RTHReviews: tick, tick… BOOM

How can a film be so powerful, so mesmerizing, and so moving as well? tick, tick… BOOM is all of that. Lin-Manuel Miranda has created a musical masterpiece here, and of course, the one on whom the film is adapted, Jonathan Larson, whose story is so moving and simultaneously inspiring as depicted in the film.

Andrew Garfield plays the role of Jonathan Larson, and what a power-packed performance that was. Right from the start to the end, you can see the character he’s playing, and not him as the actor, and that says a lot about the kind of work and effort he has put into the role. So much so, that I’m predicting an Academy nomination for him.

Speaking of the film (musical), it touches upon Larson’s life and his journey to writing his musicals, whilst touching upon the areas of love and relationships and work and passion, and how it all intersected. As the film progresses, it touches upon a lot of emotions, especially towards the latter half, it does leave you teary-eyed upon a number of occasions.

Not only that, but as it touches upon those subjects of his life, it’s not just a depiction of his life, but there are multiple takeaways that can be looked upon in one’s own life and that’s one of those powerful aspects of this film.

(Here’s the official synopsis: Based on the autobiographical musical by playwright Jonathan Larson. It’s the story of an aspiring composer in New York City who is worried he made the wrong career choice, whilst navigating the pressures of love and friendship.)

The film’s fast-paced, the songs are quite wonderful, and you do have to keep an eye because as a musical, the storyline revolves around them. Lin-Manuel Miranda and Andrew Garfield have done a stellar job with this one and I’m actually glad I watched this one. I’m a fan.

When you find the content interesting…

When you find the content interesting…

Right now, the internet is at such a stage, where all forms of content – text, audio, video, and in all durations of content, everything’s booming right now.

When it comes to a platform like TikTok or Instagram Reels or a local one of the same sorts, people feel that 15 seconds, 30 seconds, and 60 seconds videos are on the rise and it is all that everyone’s creating.

When it comes to YouTube, people are creating 30 minute-long and hour-long videos which people are watching.

When it comes to blogs or newsletters, people are writing 10,000-word articles and essays, which again people are reading. Just when some think that’s working in the text category, you look at Twitter and you notice people writing these one-liner summarized tweets, or Twitter threads, and you then wonder if that’s what’s working right now.

Whether it is content of 15 seconds, or 45 mins, or 3 hours, you’d find views and engagement on everything.

What works then? What are people consuming? And, what should you create then?

After all the data studies, all the observations, and all the behavioral analytics, it all comes down to this… When you find the content interesting, you’ll consume it.

It doesn’t matter whether you’re a fan of reading, listening to podcasts, watching Instagram Reels, or long YouTube videos, at the end of it all, when you’re interested in the topic and when you find the content interesting, then you’d consume it.

The Choice of Words

The Choice of Words

Through the words, we speak to someone, or through the words, we write (for ourselves or when we share those writings with others), or even through the words we think about, the choice of words matters.

Every word represents something, and moreover, every word has an emotion attached to it. The meaning and the emotion affect not only the receiver, but also the one who is saying or writing it, or even when thinking about it.

Just by reading the word ‘happy’, the memories attached to that word start popping up in your mind and you start feeling that emotion too. That applies in the opposite sense too, and to not just a particular word, but the meaning justified from an entire sentence, for example, “You’ll never be able to understand this”. Just by hearing that sentence, an emotion of incompleteness fills you up.

There are billions of words and hundreds of emotions (that can probably be summarized in five or so categories). But the important part is the choice of words you use for yourself and for others, verbally or through writing, all matter.

Sure, in a conscious state of mind, you might keep this in mind. But what about a situation when the moment’s got the better of you?

Maybe, at such a moment, you let your past habits and associations get the better of you and blurt something out you didn’t want to or you didn’t mean to, but at least with the self-awareness, you can learn to step up, you can learn the emotion derived from that word or sentence, the feeling of it, and try to remove it from your vocabulary.

To just understand the depth of what we speak about and what it means is such a key element in our or another individual’s life, how it affected their mind, and the impact it had on their day or more.

What am I talking about on the blog?

What am I talking about on the blog?

If you ever scroll through this blog, you’d find that the topics range from mindset and self-improvement and life (majorly those), to film reviews and lessons, and marketing tips (every now and then) and maybe a few of my personal life posts as well.

Sure, most people stick around to just one topic, but when you’re equally passionate about multiple things, then you have to just play around.

Moreover, writing every day gives me the leeway to touch upon hundreds of ideas and topics, rather than choosing one bigger idea and surrounding everything around that.

The blog definitely acts as an outlet for a lot of observations and questions that keep surfacing in my mind, and it also allows me to play around with the depth of certain topics. The more I write, the more ideas surface, and it just broadens my horizon to think more and then share that through this blog.

So, what am I talking about on this blog?
Everything that I live and think about, maybe an idea has come up but I’d still let it sit for a while until I can make my thoughts clearer about that particular topic. Anyhow, whatever I write about comes from a deep sense of curiosity, and moreover, from within. Fortunately, I’ve never had to hunt around for a topic, which for me, keeps the process more natural for me, and allows me to think about these topics on my time when they surface in my mind.

All in all, I’d love to look back at these posts after a period of time and wonder how I’d think and how my process of sharing an idea was, I definitely love checking back on a few of the previous posts, that gives me a clearer picture of whatever was on my mind and thus, giving me a clearer perspective.

Your best thinking happens when you are not thinking

Your best thinking happens when you are not thinking

How often are you on a deadline or think of this, you have scheduled a slot in your day when you will ideate on that project or that new idea or the next thing you wanted to write about, but just during those moments, you have hit the block and you feel like your brain has stopped working?

You’re sitting there completely blank, mounting pressure on yourself to come up with an idea so you can proceed to the next step.

As time passes by, you feel you have wasted so much time and now you have to think more and put more pressure on yourself.

Traditionally, we feel when we sit with the thought in mind that we have to think about a certain topic, ideas will immediately start pouring in. But unfortunately, that’s not the case (even if it works sometimes).

(Those who ideate/ think/ write that way, habitually, have a process where they get their ideas in advance and they let those ideas sit with them for a while before they even begin with the process – so technically they’re not thinking on the spot either – and that’s what this post is about)

Your best thinking happens when you’re not thinking.

Whatever you have to ideate upon, the process initiates something like this… Introduce the topic to yourself, research/ study if that is involved… And move on to the next thing.

Your brain knows you have to think about this topic, your brain subconsciously has more information than you can imagine… So now when you move on to the next thing at hand, or you divert your concentration from not thinking about one thing precisely to opening up your brain and just moving on, you have allowed yourself the freedom to expand your thoughts, to connect the dots, and to scan through all the information in your brain.

Now your best thinking is happening when you’re busy doing something else.

Somewhere out of the blue, an idea is going to strike your mind. You’ll end up thinking about what inspired you to think of this, and you’ll dedicate various different things to that inspiration without understanding that you were already thinking about this for a while now.

But getting back to it, suddenly that idea will strike… suddenly you will have the motivation to suddenly sit and proceed (or whatever the next step of action calls for that situation), and now you have clearer thoughts than before, where otherwise you would’ve been in a rut, putting pressure on yourself as to why can’t think of a particular idea/s.

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The Last 7 Days #89 (15.11 – 21.11)

With another Sunday, here’s the 89th edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.

Since the content I consume around the topics of mindset, marketing and movies brought me value, I decided to share that with you as well, through these weekly editions.

If any of the below-mentioned topics interest you, let’s chat – @rth24 on Instagram.


What To Read:

  1. Deadmau5’s ‘Oberhasli’ is what it looks like when the metaverse comes for music fans. Check it out here.
  2. Are NFTs Only Art? 7 Use Cases For NFTs. Check it out here.
  3. Nestlé says the majority of its food portfolio is unhealthy. Read it here.
  4. The No. 1 habit successful leaders share, according to executive coaches who have worked with Apple and Twitter. Read here.
  5. How Brentford Used ‘Moneyball’ to Return to the Premier League? Read more here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. Brian Armstrong, the founder of Coinbase, talks about his journey as an entrepreneur, how he started the company, and his journey until now, on How I Built This with Guy Raz. Check it out here.
  2. Eric Schmidt, the former CEO of Google, breaks down his deep insights around artificial intelligence on Rapid Response. Listen to it here.
  3. From actor to changing agent, Adrian Grenier talks about creating a symbiosis with yourself, on The Rich Roll podcast. Listen here.
  4. In this conversation on Sway, Kara Swisher talks to Hans Zimmer about his process for composing the score for “Dune,” how composers can adapt to the shifting demands of viewers and a streaming economy — and what he’s working on next. Check it out here.
  5. In this episode of Naan Curry, Sadaf and Archit discuss with Vikram Doctor, editor at Economic Times, a food historian and podcast host, what inspired him to explore food and food history, the food challenges and issues India faces in modern times, why chefs and public policy wonks should join hands to tackle hunger problems in India, and more. Listen here.

What To Watch:

  1. Gary Vaynerchuk speaks about the potential of the NFT market specifically and the cryptocurrency industry generally at the Yahoo Finance-Decrypt “Crypto Goes Mainstream” special. Watch it here.
  2. Colin and Samir talk about the business of being a YouTuber and everything to do with the creator economy, with MKBHD on the Waveform podcast. Check it out here.
  3. Akarsh Khurana, the director of Rashmi Rocket and Mismatched, talks about how to tell a story before telling it, on MostlySane’s YouTube channel. Watch here.
  4. TV Show Recommendation of the Week – Dexter: New Blood (Set 10 years after Dexter Morgan went missing in the eye of Hurricane Laura, he is now living under an assumed name in Upstate New York, Iron Lake, far from his original home in Miami.) Now streaming on Voot here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Finch (A robot that lives on a post-apocalyptic earth which was built to protect the life of his dying creator’s beloved dog, it learns about love, friendship, and the meaning of human life.) Now streaming on AppleTV+ here.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


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My Weekly Learnings #34 (14.11 – 20.11)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. “It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows.”
— Epictetus

Humility is the antidote to arrogance.

Humility is a recognition that we don’t know, that we were wrong, that we’re not better than anyone else. Humility is simple to understand but hard to practice.

Humility isn’t a lack of confidence but an earned confidence. The confidence to say that you might not be right, but you’ve done the diligence, and you’ve put in the work. Humility keeps you wondering what you’re missing or if someone is working harder than you.

And yet when pride and arrogance take over, humility flees and so does our ability to learn, adapt, and build lasting relationships with others.
Humility won’t let you take credit for luck. And humility is the voice in your mind that doesn’t let small victories seem larger than they are. Humility is the voice inside your head that says, ‘anyone can do it once, that’s luck. Can you do it consistently?’

More than knowing yourself, humility is accepting yourself. [Shane Parrish]

2. ‘Why You Should Be Prolific’
As a writer, you need to remember that your favorite creators are likely more prolific than you think.

Don’t compare your early ideas to other people’s edited and refined published works. When | interviewed the Grammy-nominated musician Logic, he said he has thousands of unreleased songs. From him, | learned that the vast majority of what every creator makes is junk. There’s no way around that.

Gobs of nonsense are part of the creative process, which is why excellence comes not from raising standards for your first drafts but from knowing what to publish and what to discard.

It’s easy to feel like a failure when you’re stuck. It’s easy to feel like you’ll never achieve your creative ambitions or your best days are behind you.

Keep making stuff. No matter how stuck you feel, commit to sitting down at the keyboard and putting ideas on paper. If your creative well is dry, surround yourself with art that stirs your soul.

Remember that the frustrations you feel in the present are the price you pay for the joy you’ll feel in the future. Progress is usually felt in retrospect when you look back at all the hours that felt like a road to nowhere. [David Perrell]

3. Whoever is worthy of teaching is sharing their knowledge for free on the internet but their content is unstructured.

But most of us are conditioned to think that only an expensive degree giving structured knowledge is worthy, making it a fantastic business. [Kunal Shah]

4. The Three Layers of the Self-Awareness Onion:
Layer 1: A simple understanding of one’s emotions.

“I’m angry… I’m really fucking angry.”

Layer 2: An ability to ask why we feel certain emotions.

“Why am I so angry all the time? What is this doing for me?”

Layer 3: Our personal values – how we measure ourselves and the world.

“I’m angry because I constantly feel as though I’m being disrespected. Am I really though?” [Mark Manson]

5.

Source: sketchplantations

“In terms of their awareness and their understanding of life”

“In terms of their awareness and their understanding of life”

As Robin Sharma wrote about in The 5 AM Club, “everyone alive does the best that they can based on where they’re at in terms of their awareness and their understanding of life.”

Even though I haven’t gotten around to reading The 5 AM Club, I’m aware of Robin Sharma’s previous works, which have had a great impact on my life. So when I was listening to one of his podcast episodes, this particular line from his book came up and immediately struck a chord within me.

All of us are on different paths of life, we have different goals, different processes, different types of thoughts, and different styles of execution. Moreover, our understanding of how people around us operate, including our close ones, is always one of mystery. There are moments when you feel why is that person acting in such a way, or why did that individual not think about this (when it was right in front to notice), or why are we not operating the same way.

Questions of these sorts hit me every now and then, with respect to different moments and different people. Being on a path of figuring out more and more about life, about how our body and mind function, and being curious about the tiniest of things, all those things at an intersection make me constantly question the old methods, make me compare the traditional vs modern methods of doing things, make me understand more and more of human behavior and humanity (in general), those types of questions do come up every now and then, wondering why do people do certain things that aren’t helpful to them, why do they make those decisions that don’t help them grow, why to be on a path because someone else did it too.

But, with respect to each and everything, this simple line that everyone is doing their best of where they’re at “in terms of their awareness and their understanding of life” just hits gold.

They might necessarily not be doing the right thing, but based on this line, in their heads (with the current level of awareness they’ve and their understanding of life), they’re doing the right thing, they’re thinking the right thing, and they’re making their decisions based on that very thing too.

Now, with choice or if they stumble upon it, if they’re able to upgrade their level of awareness, or if they are able to elevate their understanding of life (and are able to see the broader, or rather the truer picture, than what is fed to them), then that changes things.

But, until something of that sort is happening, then well, every individual is going to continue to operate “in terms of their awareness and their understanding of life.”

What the Optimum Scenario should be like?

What the Optimum Scenario should be like?

Every scenario in life has three possible outcomes: the best scenario, the optimum scenario, and the worst scenario.

These scenarios range from the most macro things in life: work, relationships, health to the most micro things in life: waking up in the morning, eating food on time, having a discussion/ argument with someone, meeting a deadline, etc.

Before you take on anything, there’s always a visualized scenario that takes place in your head, those visuals show you the best possible outcome of that particular scenario (that’s about to take place).

Whether that best possible scenario takes place or not is a different issue altogether, but right at the start, that’s what pops up in your head.

Now, as the process begins, you never know what’s going to happen, how much is in your control, and how much you’d have to adapt. That means, in reality, the outcome could go from the best possible scenario to the worst possible scenario.

Usually, when something like that happens, most people go haywire; unable to understand how to proceed, they aren’t able to process their emotions, nor their next steps.

As much as, in most of those visualized scenarios, the best possible scenarios may look the best, and the worst possible scenarios are those you don’t want to think of, especially at the beginning of the process… That leaves you with the optimum scenario.

The best possible scenario leaves you pumped up, and simultaneously, you avoid the thought of the worst possible scenario. But, said that thinking of the optimum scenario could actually be the best option for you, and something that would keep you balanced, irrespective of what happens.

The optimum scenario is playing in the middle, balancing between both of the other scenarios opposite to each other. Planning for that scenario keeps you in control (somewhat), you’re able to plan for steps beforehand, perceive things you wouldn’t have otherwise, and ultimately, stay balanced.

Thinking of the optimum scenario (in advance) means, anything beyond (the optimum) is just icing on the cake for you (that leads to the best scenario). But, anything worse, means you’re not totally disappointed, you probably have a backup (system) in place, and moreover, you’re now in a position to try and salvage as much as you can from the situation.

You’re now standing in a place, which you hadn’t imagined before, but somewhere where you can see what’s happening, plus nothing really surprises you here.

Every outcome can have these three scenarios, then it’s up to you, how you’d like to rewire your thinking, and what kind of a scenario would you like to be thinking about. Every action is followed by a thought, and every thought takes place because of a system (that is designed based on how you think and how you approach things – which is something that can easily be changed or modified).

Creating a system around your day (Part 2)

Creating a system around your day (Part 2)

Yesterday I wrote about how our life and day-to-day is nothing but a set of habits, that eventually becomes our daily routine. If those habits are helpful to you, then eventually the routine keeps you in check.

Here’s a snippet from that post, “During the day, irrespective of how many outcomes were in your favor or not, and how your emotions swung from one to another, and whether you were able to manage them or not, ultimately, your routine keeps you in check.”

Check out that post here:

When you think deeper on it, usually the routine involves one particular habit, followed by another, and another. That chain of habits, which might include waking up and then working out, having your breakfast, getting on with your work, with a break in the middle, having a cup of tea in the evening, and so on, are linked to one another.

But we are all humans, not robots. Sometimes the mood overpowers us, sometimes there could be a priority task that uproots this chain of habits, and a particular one gets left out maybe (for example, working out a particular day).

Here’s when, with self-awareness, understanding your habits work out for you. Understanding your habits isn’t enough, and neither is knowing your routine in and out, the more important thing to do is to create a system around your day.

What does it mean to create a system?

It basically means creating a flowchart of your day (mentally), creating alternative scenarios of your day, creating backups in case a particular habit has to be replaced with another, in case something gets delayed or something important comes up.

Such a system (around your routine) helps to keep you flexible, reduces your rigidity, and keeps you and your day balanced, for whatever may suddenly pop up and make you change everything.

Most people don’t like to change their days every day, knowing what you’ll be doing keeps you organized, and keeps you prepared, you retain some part of your control as well. But that also comes with its challenges, because you never know what might turn up, you have to be ready to adapt, you have to be ready for change.

Those are the moments when this concept of having not just a routine, and not just knowing your set of habits, but having a well-managed system in place comes in handy. It starts with understanding your habits, understanding what you’d want from your day-to-day, and what is necessary and what is flexible, and moreover, how much of it are you able to shuffle around.

The routine keeps you in check

The routine keeps you in check

When you shed all the exterior layers (and stories and distractions), you notice how your day-to-day, your thoughts, and actions, are all habits. Every habit that was once started, maybe without realizing, and now keeps continuing day after day.

These habits in accumulation are what one calls a routine. That routine is what an individual follows, right from the time they wake up to when they sleep. These routines include the part of your personal and professional life and all kinds of activities you do throughout the day.

Some of these particular habits help you grow, some let you cruise along, and some drain you with your energy and time.

With self-awareness, you’re able to notice all of these habits, you can then pick the ones that help you grow and evolve, and can also take the path to replace the ones that don’t.

Moreover, the point to understand is, during the day, irrespective of how many outcomes were in your favor or not, and how your emotions swung from one to another, and whether you were able to manage them or not, ultimately, your routine keeps you in check.

Some days you won’t feel like it, but that routine (especially if it’s one that helps you) brings out something in you that keeps your habits running, and irrespective of the effect of the exterior situations, you are able to keep walking ahead and proceed as you’d wanted to when you had planned this routine (in the first place).

Having a set of habits, eventually accumulated into what becomes a routine, helps you live your day, and the next.

3 Lessons to learn from the film Shershaah

3 Lessons to learn from the film Shershaah

Shershaah, a film that ticks all the boxes, right from the element of war and action, to the element of love, the background score, and the music, the cinematography, everything is just right in this film. Brilliantly led from the front by the director, Vishnuvardhan.

Check out my full review of Shershaah here:

(Here’s the synopsis of the film: The life of Indian army captain Vikram Batra, awarded with the Param Vir Chakra, India’s highest award for valor for his actions during the 1999 Kargil War.)

Moreover, the special aspect of the film is it isn’t just perfect from the cinema perspective, but the story of Capt. Vikram Batra (acted by Sidharth Malhotra) and how it was portrayed as such, that the film is an inspiration for so many and definitely leaves a few life lessons along the way too.

1. Your Passion overpowers everything else

The talk of passion has gone a bit over-the-top these days, with everyone talking about it… But when you see it, you know it. Passion is something like creativity, it flows through you, towards something, and in that flow, you are absorbed by that passion, and you put your all into it. And that is exactly what the film and the character represented as well, when you’re passionate about something, then it overpowers everything else, and that power takes you to greater heights on your path.

2. Showing love and compassion towards others

While Capt. Vikram Batra had the passion and the leadership qualities, a greater trait was the love and compassion he had for others (something that was perfectly acted by Sidharth Malhotra in the film). That love and compassion bonded him so well with others around him, so much so that his own fellow soldiers were ready to walk with him, no matter the obstacle, his loved ones were ready to make sacrifices, the passion plays a role here, but the love and compassion played a bigger one.

3. Focusing on the higher purpose

When there’s a higher purpose involved, the path you have to take is clearly visible to you. Even when there’s a complication, the purpose automatically aligns you back to the path, and that filled with passion and love and compassion is a formula for success, as shown in the film. Such a path comes with sacrifices, but when that purpose is bigger than yourself, then are you ready to go all-in.

While there could be tons of tidbits to pick up from this film, these three were the most prominent for me, apart from how inspirational and loving, and emotional this film is, as a whole.

I wish I could name the entire cast here, but in all, everyone has done such a brilliant job in the film. Moreover, the real-life soldiers who are the biggest inspiration, then and now, walk and talk these lessons every day. Thank you for all that you do, and for everything that we can learn and instill in our own lives.

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The Last 7 Days #88 (08.11 – 14.11)

With another Sunday, here’s the 88th edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.

Since the content I consume around the topics of mindset, marketing and movies brought me value, I decided to share that with you as well, through these weekly editions.

If any of the below-mentioned topics interest you, let’s chat – @rth24 on Instagram.


What To Read:

  1. Web 3.0 can repair the attention-driven digital economy. Read more here.
  2. 13 principles of Web3 (a Twitter thread by David Phelps). Check it out here.
  3. Apple CEO Tim Cook is anti-mindless scrolling. Read more about it here.
  4. Master Indian cooking with the science of tadka. Read here.
  5. Ted Lasso‘ has a question: What kind of man are you? Check it out here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. In this conversation of Sway, Kara Swisher talks to Jaron Lanier, often called the “godfather of virtual reality,” and his company, VPL Research, developed V.R. goggles and gloves in the 1980s, about Facebook’s pivot to Meta, also discuss why Lanier viewed technologies like automation and V.R. as “a little technological token of that hope of eternal creativity” back in the ’80s. Check it out on Spotify here.
  2. On My First Million, Sam Parr and Shaan Puri talk about the Metaverse and what everyone is getting wrong about it, the billion-dollar investment group that no one knows about, companies that are able to achieve viral growth without marketing, and much more. Listen to it here.
  3. Seth Godin riffs about status roles, and how it plays a factor with respect to money and skill, on Akimbo. Listen here.
  4. Sidharth Malhotra talks to Salil on Stars se Baatein about how he dealt with failure for three years after Student of The Year and Ek Villain, how he was typecast for his looks, and why Shershaah is a special film for him and his family given his Army background. Check it out here.
  5. Composer Hans Zimmer joins ReelBlend to chat topics from across his career including Dune, The Lion King, Man of Steel, Interstellar, and more. Listen to it here.

What To Watch:

  1. Gary Vaynerchuk chats with Mark Zuckerberg about the future of the Metaverse and Web3.0, taking a dive into how it will change our lives and Mark gives us his thoughts on when and how this new world will come to fruition. Watch it here.
  2. On completing 10 years of Rockstar, director-writer Imtiaz Ali, composer A.R. Rahman, lead Ranbir Kapoor, lyricist Irshad Kamil, production designer Sumit Basu, and actor Sanjana Sanghi gathered to reminisce about the making of the film; this conversation is a part of a 90-minute documentary chronicling the journey of ‘Rockstar’ that unpacks never-before-seen and heard pages from the film’s book. Check it out here.
  3. In this session of FC Front Row, Anupama Chopra does a deep dive into the brand that Ayushmann Khurrana has built and what it means to live with it. He chats with us about his film choices, his latest film Chandigarh Kare Aashiqui, his processes as an actor, and how he kept himself busy in the middle of a pandemic. Watch here.
  4. TV Show Recommendation of the Week – Tiger King (An exploration of big cat breeding and its bizarre underworld, populated by eccentric characters, namely zoo operator Joseph Maldonado-Passage.) Now streaming on Netflix here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Shershaah (The life of Indian army captain Vikram Batra, awarded with the Param Vir Chakra, India’s highest award for valor for his actions during 1999 Kargil War.) Now streaming on Amazon Prime here.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


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My Weekly Learnings #33 (07.11 – 13.11)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. 7 Stoic Questions to ask every day:
i. Is this in my control?
ii. Is this essential/ necessary?
iii. What’s the worst case? Am I prepared?
iv. Where can I do better?
v. What habit bonfires am I fueling?
vi. How can I make the best of this?
vii. (When people irritate you) When have I acted like that? [The Daily Stoic]

2. “Most people optimize for the day ahead. A few people optimize for 1-2 years ahead. Almost nobody optimizes for 3-4 years ahead (or longer).

The person who is willing to delay gratification longer than most reduces competition and gains a decisive advantage.

Patience is power.” [James Clear]

3. Writer David Foster Wallace on the importance of controlling your attention:

“Twenty years after my own graduation, I have come gradually to understand that the liberal arts cliché about “teaching you how to think” is actually shorthand for a much deeper, more serious idea: Learning how to think really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what you think. It means being conscious and aware enough to choose what you pay attention to and to choose how you construct meaning from experience. Because if you cannot exercise this kind of choice in adult life, you will be totally hosed.”
[Source: This is Water]

4. At first, we sold our labor. That was 10,000 years of history. You traded sweat for food.

Eventually, people figured out that they could build an organization. And an organization made things, which someone could buy. Add some technology and machines and productivity would go up, things would get better, and profits would result. Industrial capitalism. This is the sort of project that most people think about when someone says “I’m going to start a business.”

But there are other options.

Linux and Wikipedia and the local farmer’s market are all projects. They may or may not lead to a profit for every person who engages with them, but they’re distinct entities that organize various talents and inputs and create value for the people they serve.

Stemming climate change, stopping the spread of disease, and fighting homelessness are also projects. They may not have coordinating bodies or a single entity, but they represent a combination of ideas, people, and initiatives that are coordinated through culture.

Bitcoin is a multi-trillion-dollar project with no one in charge.

As our world gets more connected, the projects that change us are more and more likely to have a form that would be hard to recognize just a generation ago. But inventing and choosing and supporting these projects is now on us, and it begins by recognizing that they even exist. [Seth Godin]

5. The basic principles of constructive feedback:
A. Before you give it, ask if they want to receive it.
B. Be clear that you believe in their potential and care about their success.
C. Be as candid as possible in what you say and as thoughtful as possible in how you say it. [Adam Grant]

RTHReviews: Shershaah

RTHReviews: Shershaah

A film that topped my watchlist for a long time now, and I’m glad that I finally caught up with it.

I don’t remember when was the last Hindi film or even a film in the war genre which was so well-made, a film that ticks all the boxes and hits all the emotions there could possibly be.

The last time a film in this genre was so refreshing to watch was Lakshya, and I feel this tops it in a lot of ways, even though both have their advantages and there’s really no need to compare them.

The biggest focal point of the film is Siddharth Malhotra, how good has he characterized Capt. Vikram Batra, the work that he has put in, and you can obviously see the outcome. If you weren’t a fan already, after watching this, you sure will be.

Kiara Advani was fantastic in her role as well, along with the other cast members. As the film proceeds, the writers and the director ensure to focus on each character, which makes you feel for them at various points in the film.

As I said before, the film ticks all the boxes, right from the element of war and action, to the element of love, the background score and the music, the cinematography, everything is just right in this film. Brilliantly led from the front by the director, Vishnuvardhan. Overall, the film is fast-paced, plus you’re invested in it right from the beginning, I couldn’t find nor think of any flaws that would make the film less lovable.

Shershaah is perfect. An exemplary example of a well-made war film, a Hindi film, a Siddharth Malhotra film. This film just took my breath away, so much so that even after 24 hours the film has definitely stayed with me and made a mark too. Couldn’t recommend it enough.

You have to take the initiative

You have to take the initiative

Whenever you want something done, you may wait for things to happen; you may wait for someone else to do it, but there’s a lot of waiting to do, and a lot of expectations to have in such kinds of moments.

Most times, you waste your time, or rather the disappointment of your expectations hit you hard.

Instead, you may want to think of proceeding in a different manner. You may want to take initiative (in the first place) and get things moving.

It’s better to be in control, it’s better to run the plan according to how you deem it fit, and now instead of all the waiting for someone and expecting, you drop all of that, and proceed, having taken that initiative.

There’s a lot of contexts here too, especially one, where you may want to know what you’re getting into. But even understanding the message here, and implying it in your life, you’ll notice that this initiative lead will change things around in the majority of how you live your life on a day-to-day basis.

You remember the how not the what

You remember the how not the what

Unless you’re an expert at a particular something, how often do you know the a to z of a particular topic? We feel we know things, but that is only true when you can speak about it.

Otherwise, we feel that we know a lot, and don’t need to learn anymore.

But here’s the catch of it all… When you look back, introspecting what you know and how you use that information in your personal and professional lives, you realize you remember the how not the what.

The what constitutes the technicalities, the terms, the theoretical knowledge, one that people speak that makes you think how they know so much.

The how is the process, the understanding of how it’s done. Basically, you know the same things, but without the what, it doesn’t make you sound like an expert.

Unless you’re interested in the what (and want to make it the center point of your study), there’s no point spending any time on it, because it’d be wasted (that’s the reason where most learning stops or people don’t proceed to the next step, because the what seems difficult).

But knowing this simple fact can be an advantage for you, to learn more and to know more. Now that you know you remember the how not the what… What you can do is this, whenever you learn more and try to upgrade your knowledge, instead of spending time on the what, you can instead spend your time, focusing on the how – so you can understand the subject at hand better, you can understand the process better, and ultimately use it to upgrade your knowledge and your life better, in whatever way you think it seems useful.

Until you don’t

Until you don’t

Until you don’t eat properly, you don’t realize the impact of your previous eating habits and the change after.

Until you don’t work out regularly, you don’t realize what not working out was doing to your mind and body.

Until you don’t start learning on a daily basis, you don’t realize the limitations of your knowledge.

Until you don’t start meditating, you don’t realize the chaotic life you were living blindly; and you don’t understand the importance of stillness.

Until you don’t start addressing your emotions, you feel like everything’s okay, but that’s just your outer shell hiding what’s within.

Until you don’t start living your life on your terms, you continue to live based on what one individual said or did hundreds of years ago and what has now become a social construct.

Until you don’t (the list is endless).

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The Last 7 Days #87 (01.11 – 07.11)

With another Sunday, here’s the 87th edition of my weekly series, The Last 7 Days.

What’s it about?

It’s a weekly series where I talk about what I read, what I listened to, and what I saw in the last seven days.

Since the content I consume around the topics of mindset, marketing and movies brought me value, I decided to share that with you as well, through these weekly editions.

If any of the below-mentioned topics interest you, let’s chat – @rth24 on Instagram.


What To Read:

  1. Why melatonin is known as the ‘master switch’ of the human body? Check it out here.
  2. How do you build a personal brand when your life is in chaos? Read more here.
  3. Early Riser or Night Owl? New Study May Help to Explain the Difference. Check it out here.
  4. The psychology behind why you spend so much money on Amazon Prime. Read it here.
  5. The underrated pleasures of eating dinner early. Read here.

What To Listen:

*The links being attached redirect to Spotify, but you can search for these episode titles wherever you listen to your podcasts.

  1. On The Tim Ferriss Show, Chris Dixon and Naval Ravikant talk about the Wonders of Web3, how to pick the Right Hill to climb, finding the right amount of crypto regulation, and the Untapped Potential of NFTs. Listen to it here.
  2. On this episode of Decoder, vice president of Reality Labs Andrew Bosworth talked with The Verge’s Alex Heath about Facebook’s rebrand to Meta, how content moderation will work in the metaverse, and the hardware journey from virtual to mixed reality, and eventually, AR glasses. Check it out here.
  3. In this episode of Life Kit, New York Times technology reporter Taylor Lorenz shares how spending less time on email and changing the way she thought about online communication has increased her productivity and given her back hours of time. Listen here.
  4. In this episode of Naan Curry, Sadaf and Archit explore the global and local history of potatoes, how the British used potatoes to spread their colonialism in India, its health benefits, and much more. Check it out here.
  5. Tom Hanks talks about the concept of war films, ‘Saving Private Ryan’ and some other films, and anecdotes from the early days, on the Smartless podcast. Listen to it here.

What To Watch:

  1. Sara Dietschy chats with Mark Zuckerberg on Facebook’s name change to Meta, centralized vs decentralized organizations, and what the Metaverse means for creators, and there’s a meme review too. Check it out here.
  2. HBR editor in chief Adi Ignatius interviews the Microsoft CEO, Satya Nadella to discuss what team collaboration will look like going forward, the next generation of workplace technology, the new imperatives of leadership — and whether and when our future workplaces will in fact start to look like the “metaverse” fantasies of science fiction. Watch it here.
  3. On this episode of ‘Notes on a Scene,’ ‘Venom: Let There Be Carnage‘ director Andy Serkis breaks down the scene where Venom and Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy) finally come together in an argument turned to fight. Serkis walks us through his vision for the action sequence frame by frame and highlights where exactly Tom Hardy adds his own sound effects. Watch here.
  4. TV Show Recommendation of the Week – Succession (The Logan family is known for controlling the biggest media and entertainment company in the world. However, their world changes when their father steps down from the company.) Now streaming on Hotstar here.
  5. Movie Recommendation of the Week – Sooryavanshi (Starting off from where Akshay Kumar`s character was introduced in Simmba, Sooryavanshi traces the acts and serious antics of DCP Veer Sooryavanshi, the chief of the Anti-Terrorism Squad in India.) Now in theatres and streaming on Netflix, December 5th onwards.

There is a lot of insightful, engaging, and entertaining content mixed in all of this.

If any of these topics interest you, then your time will be well-spent.

You can check out the previous editions of The Last 7 Days – here.


RTHReviews: Sooryavanshi

RTHReviews: Sooryavanshi

Say anything, Rohit Shetty definitely knows how to make a film for the big screen, and even though we had to wait two years for this… The wait was absolutely WORTH IT.

Here’s the synopsis of the film – Starting off from where Akshay Kumar`s character was introduced in Simmba, Sooryavanshi traces the acts and serious antics of DCP Veer Sooryavanshi, the chief of the Anti-Terrorism Squad in India.

The RSCU – Rohit Shetty Cop Universe continues to grow, now adding Sooryavanshi to the roster. Sure, some things are over the top, and some were surely stretched, but the vision of this universe is so magnificent, that everything else can be overlooked.

Also, Rohit Shetty cannot let a film by without adding some kind of social message, and even though it may seem extra, it’s a package deal that comes along and as the audience, we have to accept that.

Coming to the cast, there are so many recognizable faces, and yet when you think there are too many, everyone plays a vital role.

The highly-awaited and hyped trio of Singham, Simmba, and Sooryavanshi was just wow, a moment of goosebumps, glad to see something like this brewing in our film industry too.

Awaiting for the next Singham now.

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My Weekly Learnings #32 (31.10 – 06.11)

Amidst all the content I consume every week, through this weekly series of ‘My Weekly Learnings’, sharing highlights of content pieces that caught my eye and provided more value than I could imagine.

(P.S. Every Sunday, I share a list of what to read, listen to, and watch, in my weekly series, The Last 7 Days. You can check out the editions here).

1. In my experience, not body weight but these are the factors that improve health — healthy mother
– good education
– strong family bonds
– access to doctors
– well-paying jobs
– athletic childhood
– living in green walkable cities

Health is multidisciplinary, not a number. [Rujuta Diwekar]

2. Charcoal & Diamonds are both carbons. The difference lies in the configuration of the carbon atoms in them.

There’s a big lesson in here.

You can increase the value of something by changing its very nature by re-organizing its building blocks.

Inputs <> Outputs [Kavin Bharti Mittal]

3. Tips To Building Your Emotional Intelligence:

– Accept that you can’t be happy all the time
– Start to identify emotions in other people and yourself
– Accept that not all emotions have to mean something
– Identify when zero response is the best response [Mark Manson]

4. “MOTIVATION” = EFFORT + (INTERMITTENT) REWARD

Dopamine is the common currency of motivation, pleasure, and pursuit of pleasures. Everybody enjoys pleasure. That said if you achieve pleasure from food or experiences without having to put in any effort pretty soon those pleasures lose their potency. That doesn’t mean we stop pursuing pleasures but it lowers our baseline level of dopamine and causes us to pursue progressively smaller goals. That is not good.

These days pleasure is available to us without any work: High potency food, experiences, etc. that don’t require any strain or effort to achieve.

Some small amount of that is fine of course but the best way to keep your dopamine system tuned up for ongoing motivation and pursuit is to periodically avoid pleasures that are easy to access, focusing instead on pleasures that take effort to achieve. And sometimes it can even be useful to not reward yourself at all for hard work and instead just cycle right back into another round of effort. Of course, get your rest and your sleep too so you can continue to be motivated and in pursuit (and pleasure) for all your days and years. [Andrew Huberman]

5. “There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. That will be the beginning.”

‘Up to a point a person’s life is shaped by environment, heredity, and changes in the world about them. Then there comes a time when it lies within their grasp to shape the clay of their life into the sort of thing they wish it to be. Only the weak blame parents, their race, their times, lack of good fortune, or the quirks of fate. Everyone has the power to say, “This I am today. That I shall be tomorrow.” [Louis L’Amour – The Walking Drum]

RTHReviews: The Harder They Fall

RTHReviews: The Harder They Fall

Every year, amongst all Western genre films, there’s always one to look out for and this year it turns out to be ‘The Harder They Fall’.

While the film seems to have a basic storyline*, it’s never the case with a film of this genre. Jeymes Samuel has done such a fabulous job with the film, right from the music (which is such a key element in the film and gives a good boost to every scene) to how the story evolves. Some of the shots are great to watch and it almost reminisces the Western classics.

*Here’s the synopsis – When an outlaw discovers his enemy is being released from prison, he reunites his gang to seek revenge. Now streaming on Netflix here.

The film may seem slow at times, but the background score and moreover, the cast keeps the ground running, which keeps you invested in the film. Speaking of the cast, what a great ensemble. Right from Jonathan Majors to Regina King, Idris Elba, Lakeith Stanfield, RJ Cyler, and all the others, a fabulous piece of work, I’m sure there are a few award contenders here.

In all, I felt it’s a great watch, especially if you are interested in the genre because it doesn’t disappoint.

One Line Review: Watch it for Jonathan Majors.